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Glore Psychiatric Museum Ghost Hunt

Glore Psychiatric Museum Ghost Hunt

Friday May 21st, 2021, 8:15PM - Saturday May 22nd, 2021, 2:30AM

Glore Psychiatric MuseumSaint Joseph, MO Location Map

The #Haunted Glore Psychiatric Museum is one haunted location in Missouri! It's educational and its haunted! We have exclusive overnight access to this very haunted location, including access to the very foreboding underground tunnel that now connects into the prison.

You will also have access to the museum to participate in your own history and walk around and this is included in the price. Access is available from 10am until 5pm. Last entry is at 3:30pm. You will then return at 8:15pm for the overnight Ghost Hunt.

Ghost hunting #haunted Is This Paranormal

The Glore Psychiatric Museum in St. Joseph, Missouri satisfies the intriguing lure of the Lunatic Asylums of the 19th and 20th Century. Listed as one of the top 50 unique museums in the world and one of the most haunted locations in Missouri, the museum is housed in the state’s former lunatic asylum where the patients still linger in the shadows!

The hauntings that have been documented and experienced in the museum started long before the St. Joseph’s State Hospital closed its doors and converted the corridors for educational purposes. With macabre devices and haunted objects on display, there is no doubt that the spirits are still lingering and just waiting to share their stories with you! Paranormal investigators from around the globe have flocked to the location to document the evolutionary history of mental illness treatment and communicate with those who were victims to their barbaric practices!

The facility opened in 1872 as the State Lunatic Asylum No. 2. Over the course of 127 years they expanded from 275 to 3,000 beds. The thousands of patients ranged from those who were diagnosed as criminally insane to those who were able to receive rehabilitating treatment and be reintegrated into society. Among those were the few unfortunate souls who were committed by their families because they “…had become lazy with [their] housework.”

All of the patients were submitted to state-of-the-art mental illness treatments that were considered helpful at the time but in retrospect we realize that some of these so-called treatments were often the cause and not the cure for insanity. Centrifuge therapy (spinning a patient in a device at high speeds), hydrotherapy (from ice baths that could last for days to scalding patients), cages used to contain patients until they “calmed down,” lobotomies, shock therapy, fever therapy (elevating body temperatures to abnormal levels, often used to treat syphilis which was rampant at the facility), tranquilizer chairs (strapping patients to a chair for weeks at a time using bloodletting with leaches and knives), and several other treatments that horrify our modern minds were all used at St. Joseph’s State Hospital.

The horrifying cures obviously left a terrified mark on the building, but other contributing factors may have led to the hauntings of the corridors. Many of the patients that were housed at the asylum never had visitors because their families simply abandoned them after they were committed. In the early years the graves of the patients were unmarked before they were simply engraved with an identifying number. Does the lack of acknowledgement in their final resting place leave the spirits feeling as unwanted in death as they felt in life?

Around the time George Glore started the display of historical artifacts in the evolution of mental illness treatments in 1967, St. Joseph’s State Hospital began to earn its reputation for being haunted. The staff would see shadow figures and apparitions roaming the hallways and always felt as if they were being watched. There was one patient who was known for her interaction with the “spirits” of the institution—she created art, wrote poems and songs detailing her experience with the paranormal activity.

If you’re investigating the morgue, watch for the full-bodied apparition of a man. He’s often been seen around the elevators and several investigators have caught an EVP (electronic voice phenomena) of a male voice screaming “GET OUT!” Disembodied whispering is often reported as well as a female voice calling out your name when no one else is around! Moaning, whimpering, crying—it’s easy to imagine that the sounds are patients still looking for someone who wants to be their friend.

The only question that remains—are you brave enough to undergo a lone vigil in the underground tunnels?
... See MoreSee Less

35 People Interested
Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Friday May 21st, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday May 22nd, 2021, 4:00AM

314 NW 4th St, Mineral Wells, TX 76067-4939, United States Location Map

The sun is shining, and the year is 1931.

The residents of Mineral Wells had no idea the Holy Sisters of Nazareth were making their way to this “Crazy” Haunted town to take up a life that would make a name for this small town in Texas.

With Minerals Wells already known for their “Crazy Water”, yes you read that right, this historic town has something so special in the water that hundreds of thousands of visitor’s flock here yearly.

And before you think that the “crazy water” is a myth, you simply have no idea…when you visit, and you will, make sure you take some home with you and find out why it is so special.

Let’s go back to 1931.

With the sisters climbing 7 floors, 14 flights and 126 steps, they settled into the top of this 46-room hospital, with an entourage of doctors and janitor.

Who knew that many of them would spend their final days in the Nazareth Hospital caring for the sick and those in need.

Many of them were unaware of what was about to unfold over the forthcoming years, and how much they would be needed.

The Nazareth Hospital would become a beacon of hope in Mineral Wells and no one could have predicted the events that would embed into these walls and remain unexplained.

Welcome to the Nazareth Hospital, sorry we meant, the Haunted Nazareth, and former Sanatorium Hospital.

The Holy Sisters bought the building for about $135,000 which would equate to more than $2 million today. The sisters were unaware that the land was used as a Bordello, and on that subject we will leave that part right here….

It housed its own crematorium which still sits on the site today, which was last used around the 1940’s – 1950’s.

You will soon understand that love and care was a fundamental part of the hospital.

In the 1960’s the hospital added on the name “sanatorium”.

This mighty building was a beacon of hope, protection and love, and it even survived two major fires!

Every inch of this hospital had a purpose, and every floor was used to its full potential.

The 1st floor housed Tuberculosis, Polio and Psychiatric Patients.

The 2nd floor was originally designated for administrative purposes.

The 3rd floor was used as the Chapel and patient rooms.

The 4th floor was the labor and delivery room.

The 5th floor was the surgical units.

The 6th floor Nun’s quarters

The 7th floor was occupied by the Priest, until he was relocated to the property behind the crematorium.

It is no wonder why the Nazareth Hospital has a haunted reputation, those very unique people who worked here still haunt this building, and those unfortunate souls who lost their lives still wander the very empty corridors.

Do you have what it takes to walk in the shadows of those departed?


Your ghost hunt at Nazareth Sanatorium includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.
... See MoreSee Less

6 People Interested
Gettysburg Ghost Hunt & Psychic Development Workshop

Gettysburg Ghost Hunt & Psychic Development Workshop

Saturday May 22nd, 2021, 3:00PM - Sunday May 23rd, 2021, 10:00AM

Baladerry Inn40 Hospital RoadGettysburg, PA17325 Location Map

The Baladerry Inn is one of the most haunted locations in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania We have exclusive private access to this very haunted location, which used to be a field hospital.

This is an exclusive psychic medium event and includes the following:

Paranormal Intuitive Development Workshop (Worth over $200 per person INCLUDED)
Overnight Accommodation,
Psychic Séance to contact loved ones that have passed,
2 Psychic Mediums,
Exclusive Ghost Hunt and History Tour at our secret location which is alongside the battlefield,
3 Course Dinner with complimentary wine,
Ghost Hunting Vigils with exclusive access to the Battlefield and the Field Hospital Room,
Complimentary Soda, Coffee and Snacks during Ghost Hunt,
Hot Breakfast,
All Room Taxes and Meal Gratuity Included

Pennsylvania #haunted Ghost hunting BuzzFeed

The Baladerry Inn was built as a farmhouse in 1812 on the outskirts of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania as part of the George Bushman farm. The picturesque countryside was an ideal location for agricultural growth but soon it would come to know the taste of blood. Ghost Adventures Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania

The fateful battle that would become a strong determining factor of the Civil War took place in the small town and fields of Gettysburg from July 1st-July 3rd of 1863. General Robert E. Lee had crushed the Union forces at Chancellorsville and began to advance his Army of Northern Virginia into Pennsylvania in the latter part of June of the same year. There he would clash with the Union Army of the Potomac led by General George G. Meade.

The bulk of both the Confederate and Union forces engaged in battle at the crossroads town of Gettysburg. The three days of fighting left heavy casualties on both sides. The Union Army lost 23,000 men while the Confederates lost upwards of 28,000. With the loss at Gettysburg, the Confederates lost the hope of foreign recognition of their cause and led General Lee to offer his resignation to President Jefferson Davis. The offer was declined but after the Battle of Gettysburg and the Battle of Vicksburg, the Civil War was turned in the Union favor.

During these days of battle, the Baladerry Inn, like many other homes around the battlefields, served as a field hospital for wounded soldiers and civilians alike. The main hall was used to treat the soldiers where several amputations took place. You can imagine that with the lack of anesthesia and very little attention given to sterility, many soldiers met their demise. There was nothing but whiskey to dull the pain and infection ran rampant amongst them.

Today, there is still a blood stain forever etched into the hardwood planks of the Baladerry Inn. Forensic methods using luminol and UV lighting has revealed the marks left by the Civil War soldiers so many years ago.

Today the Baladerry Inn serves as bed and breakfast with 10 rooms between the main house and the carriage house. Many of the original architectural structures are still standing such as the brick fireplace that is the central figure in the spacious Great Room. Although it is a relaxing retreat from the hustle and bustle of the world, you should know that you rarely sleep alone.

There are many spirits that still linger around the Baladerry Inn. Those most often seen are the Confederate Soldiers that died in and around the property. Perhaps you will have the great fortune of meeting one of the Southern Gentlemen and hearing the tales of when cotton was high and the hopes of a nation died on a battlefield in a northern crossroads town.
... See MoreSee Less

34 People Interested  ·  3 People Going
Glore Psychiatric Museum Ghost Hunt

Glore Psychiatric Museum Ghost Hunt

Saturday May 22nd, 2021, 8:15PM - Sunday May 23rd, 2021, 2:30AM

Glore Psychiatric MuseumSaint Joseph, MO Location Map

The #Haunted Glore Psychiatric Museum is one haunted location in Missouri! It's educational and its haunted! We have exclusive overnight access to this very haunted location, including access to the very foreboding underground tunnel that now connects into the prison.

You will also have access to the museum to participate in your own history and walk around and this is included in the price. Access is available from 10am until 5pm. Last entry is at 3:30pm. You will then return at 8:15pm for the overnight Ghost Hunt.

Ghost hunting #haunted Is This Paranormal

The Glore Psychiatric Museum in St. Joseph, Missouri satisfies the intriguing lure of the Lunatic Asylums of the 19th and 20th Century. Listed as one of the top 50 unique museums in the world and one of the most haunted locations in Missouri, the museum is housed in the state’s former lunatic asylum where the patients still linger in the shadows!

The hauntings that have been documented and experienced in the museum started long before the St. Joseph’s State Hospital closed its doors and converted the corridors for educational purposes. With macabre devices and haunted objects on display, there is no doubt that the spirits are still lingering and just waiting to share their stories with you! Paranormal investigators from around the globe have flocked to the location to document the evolutionary history of mental illness treatment and communicate with those who were victims to their barbaric practices!

The facility opened in 1872 as the State Lunatic Asylum No. 2. Over the course of 127 years they expanded from 275 to 3,000 beds. The thousands of patients ranged from those who were diagnosed as criminally insane to those who were able to receive rehabilitating treatment and be reintegrated into society. Among those were the few unfortunate souls who were committed by their families because they “…had become lazy with [their] housework.”

All of the patients were submitted to state-of-the-art mental illness treatments that were considered helpful at the time but in retrospect we realize that some of these so-called treatments were often the cause and not the cure for insanity. Centrifuge therapy (spinning a patient in a device at high speeds), hydrotherapy (from ice baths that could last for days to scalding patients), cages used to contain patients until they “calmed down,” lobotomies, shock therapy, fever therapy (elevating body temperatures to abnormal levels, often used to treat syphilis which was rampant at the facility), tranquilizer chairs (strapping patients to a chair for weeks at a time using bloodletting with leaches and knives), and several other treatments that horrify our modern minds were all used at St. Joseph’s State Hospital.

The horrifying cures obviously left a terrified mark on the building, but other contributing factors may have led to the hauntings of the corridors. Many of the patients that were housed at the asylum never had visitors because their families simply abandoned them after they were committed. In the early years the graves of the patients were unmarked before they were simply engraved with an identifying number. Does the lack of acknowledgement in their final resting place leave the spirits feeling as unwanted in death as they felt in life?

Around the time George Glore started the display of historical artifacts in the evolution of mental illness treatments in 1967, St. Joseph’s State Hospital began to earn its reputation for being haunted. The staff would see shadow figures and apparitions roaming the hallways and always felt as if they were being watched. There was one patient who was known for her interaction with the “spirits” of the institution—she created art, wrote poems and songs detailing her experience with the paranormal activity.

If you’re investigating the morgue, watch for the full-bodied apparition of a man. He’s often been seen around the elevators and several investigators have caught an EVP (electronic voice phenomena) of a male voice screaming “GET OUT!” Disembodied whispering is often reported as well as a female voice calling out your name when no one else is around! Moaning, whimpering, crying—it’s easy to imagine that the sounds are patients still looking for someone who wants to be their friend.

The only question that remains—are you brave enough to undergo a lone vigil in the underground tunnels?
... See MoreSee Less

258 People Interested  ·  7 People Going
Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Saturday May 22nd, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday May 23rd, 2021, 4:00AM

314 NW 4th St, Mineral Wells, TX 76067-4939, United States Location Map

The sun is shining, and the year is 1931.

The residents of Mineral Wells had no idea the Holy Sisters of Nazareth were making their way to this “Crazy” Haunted town to take up a life that would make a name for this small town in Texas.

With Minerals Wells already known for their “Crazy Water”, yes you read that right, this historic town has something so special in the water that hundreds of thousands of visitor’s flock here yearly.

And before you think that the “crazy water” is a myth, you simply have no idea…when you visit, and you will, make sure you take some home with you and find out why it is so special.

Let’s go back to 1931.

With the sisters climbing 7 floors, 14 flights and 126 steps, they settled into the top of this 46-room hospital, with an entourage of doctors and janitor.

Who knew that many of them would spend their final days in the Nazareth Hospital caring for the sick and those in need.

Many of them were unaware of what was about to unfold over the forthcoming years, and how much they would be needed.

The Nazareth Hospital would become a beacon of hope in Mineral Wells and no one could have predicted the events that would embed into these walls and remain unexplained.

Welcome to the Nazareth Hospital, sorry we meant, the Haunted Nazareth, and former Sanatorium Hospital.

The Holy Sisters bought the building for about $135,000 which would equate to more than $2 million today. The sisters were unaware that the land was used as a Bordello, and on that subject we will leave that part right here….

It housed its own crematorium which still sits on the site today, which was last used around the 1940’s – 1950’s.

You will soon understand that love and care was a fundamental part of the hospital.

In the 1960’s the hospital added on the name “sanatorium”.

This mighty building was a beacon of hope, protection and love, and it even survived two major fires!

Every inch of this hospital had a purpose, and every floor was used to its full potential.

The 1st floor housed Tuberculosis, Polio and Psychiatric Patients.

The 2nd floor was originally designated for administrative purposes.

The 3rd floor was used as the Chapel and patient rooms.

The 4th floor was the labor and delivery room.

The 5th floor was the surgical units.

The 6th floor Nun’s quarters

The 7th floor was occupied by the Priest, until he was relocated to the property behind the crematorium.

It is no wonder why the Nazareth Hospital has a haunted reputation, those very unique people who worked here still haunt this building, and those unfortunate souls who lost their lives still wander the very empty corridors.

Do you have what it takes to walk in the shadows of those departed?


Your ghost hunt at Nazareth Sanatorium includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.
... See MoreSee Less

5 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Thursday May 27th, 2021, 8:30PM - Friday May 28th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

105 People Interested  ·  5 People Going
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Friday May 28th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday May 29th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

52 People Interested  ·  3 People Going
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Friday May 28th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday May 29th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

7 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Saturday May 29th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday May 30th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

10 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Saturday May 29th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday May 30th, 2021, 4:00AM

308 Lee Rd, Mineral Wells, TX 76067, United States Location Map

Our ghost hunts at the #haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

Your ghost hunt at the Beach Army Hospital includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks

History:

In the middle of a beautiful field in Mineral Wells, Texas stands an ominous building.

At over 90,000 square feet, the structure looks like something out of a James Bond movie. With more than three floors, this imposing building houses a two-level basement and more rooms than your mind will let you imagine. It is truly massive.

You have arrived at the Beach Army Hospital on the former Camp Wolters site.

With World War II still raging, Camp Wolter was ordered to serve as an infantry replacement training center on March 19th, 1941.

Camp Wolters housed as many as 30,000 soldiers at peak, thus requiring a centralized hospital for the six troop staging areas.

The original US Army hospital construction was a frame structure covered with gypsum board walls on the interior, and with metal siding on the exterior.

The hospital was equipped to handle 750 patients.

When Camp Wolters was transferred to the Air Force base, these buildings were in desperate need of very expensive repairs to bring them up to usable standard. At that time, the camp was renamed Wolters Air Force Base.

The Air Force requested and received funds to build a new hospital, and this is when the Beach Army Hospital became the building that it is today.

Construction started in the 1950’s and by March 29th, 1957 the Beach Army Hospital opened its doors as a medical institution. At a cost of $2.5 million dollars, which would equate to $9.3 million in today’s money.

This hospital was the first of its kind to specialize in aviation medicine for the United States Military.

It was designed to handle 100 patients, with an expansion capability for 200 patients. The facility was equipped with surgical, delivery, lavatory, kitchen and examination rooms.

Soon after completion, the United States Army gained control of the camp and it became the Primary Helicopter Center where all rotary wing pilots received their primary flight training.

Later – in June of 1963, the camp was renamed Fort Wolters.

Countless men, women, and families of the United States Military walked its halls and long corridors, whilst those that were hospitalized called it their home.

This left a permanent imprint on the building and on American History.

Shortly after 1970 this massive structure closed its doors.

Paranormal:

Our ghost hunts at the haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

The hospital has laid dormant and untouched for its nearly 50 years of abandonment. The aesthetics remain as well as those who once inhabited the property!

Make no mistake about it…….the paranormal activity that plagues this former hospital can be intense.

The unseen occupants taunt all those who visit, with whispers in ears, unpleasant touches, and faint smells of the past!

Due to the satanic worship, and “doors” opened, the paranormal experiences have intensified.

Around every corner and on every floor that you climb, you will be welcomed with the residual energy. The imprinted energy into the abandoned hospital beds, wheelchairs, and the morgue will last forever!

However, don’t let this fool you. The spirits are beyond intelligent and will interact in unbeknownst ways!

Are you ready for the unknown, and an adventure like no other?
... See MoreSee Less

114 People Interested  ·  3 People Going
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Friday June 4th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday June 5th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

57 People Interested  ·  3 People Going
White Hill Mansion Ghost Hunt

White Hill Mansion Ghost Hunt

Friday June 4th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday June 5th, 2021, 4:00AM

Friends of White Hill Mansion217 4th StFieldsboro, NJ08505 Location Map

White Hill Mansion is one of the most #haunted locations in New Jersey. The Paranormal Activity that has been witnessed, captured and experienced here will leave you breathless.

A mansion filled with Secrets!

One of the most haunted locations in New Jersey is a home that is nearly 300 years old. The White Hill Mansion has served as a family home, bordello, speakeasy, restaurant, and office building throughout the course of its existence. The spirits that still lurk in the shadows are eager to share three centuries worth of secrets and it doesn’t take much effort to get them to speak! As featured on Paranormal Lockdown, the haunting of White Hill Mansion is known as one of the most active locations in the Northeast!


Robert Field II inherited White Hill from his father in 1757. Robert was deeply involved in the Colonial Efforts leading up to the Revolutionary War and suddenly died under mysterious circumstances by drowning in the Delaware River in 1775. Mary, his wife, was left to run the property and raise three young children during the war. Her neighbors gladly sold her out as a rebel sympathizer leading the British to seize the property and use it as temporary quarters. The troops that occupied White Hill were the Hessian Army (the German troops hired by the British to assist in the war). One of the most common paranormal experiences is the German accented voice coming from the attic. Could it be one of the troops that made themselves at home during the Revolutionary War? Or perhaps its Heinrich Glenk who opened an upscale German restaurant with his wife at White Hill in 1923?

Many guests that visit White Hill talk about seeing a shadow figure that lurks around the basement. The figure creeps up next to people and then slinks back into the darkness. He has no respect for personal space. Others report disembodied voices, the sounds of children playing, footsteps up and down the stairs, EVPs (electronic voice phenomena) captured of a talkative woman who claims to be a former servant, a full-bodied apparition of a woman that many believe to be Mary Field watching sternly over the house, lights turning on and off of their own volition, objects being moved and hidden, a spirit that tugs on people’s clothing, a lighthearted prankster that enjoys toying with guests—the White Hill Mansion is a paranormal enthusiasts’ dream!

Over the centuries, White Hill Mansion has served as a family home, housed rum smugglers during prohibition, served as a bordello and speakeasy, a restaurant for over 50 years, an office building and now as a beacon of history full of secrets. During the restoration of White Hill, they conducted two archaeological digs that uncovered 30,000 artifacts leading to the speculation that the property itself was built on an ancient Native American settlement. With all of the history, it’s no wonder that White Hill is one of the most haunted houses in New Jersey.

The only question that remains—will you be brave enough to encounter the shadow man!?!?

Location History:

In 1722, Robert Field acquired White Hill and began construction of a home on the property. His son, aptly named Robert Field, inherited the property in 1757 where he lived with his wife and three small children before mysteriously drowning in the Delaware River on January 29, 1775. His wife, Mary, was left to run the 600 acres and raise their children during the tumultuous Revolutionary War.

Several of her neighbors were British sympathizers who jumped at the opportunity to curry favor with the Brits by reporting Mary as a colonialist. The rumors were supported by evidence of Captain Houston of the American Navy docking at White Hill and having dinner with Mary and her family. Of course, her support of the colonials led to the British Army seizing her home and searching the property for rebels in December of 1776. Captain Wrenden of the Hessian army (the German troops hired by the British during the Revolutionary War) decided to use White Hill as his temporary quarters and during his stay the Hessian Colonel Carl von Donop paid Mary a visit. Her hospitality, albeit forced upon her, helped to preserve White Hill throughout the duration of the war.

After the war, in 1779, Mary remarried Commodore Thomas Read who named White Hill his County Seat. The two lived happily together until his death at White Hill in 1788. Mary, widowed twice, remained in charge of the property until she signed it over to her son in 1797. Robert III’s ownership of the estate was short lived as he lost White Hill in 1804. His wife, Abigail nee Stockton, had a caring brother that wanted to preserve his family’s reputation. In doing so, he purchased White Hill and allowed Robert and Abigail to continue to live on the property.

Throughout the 19th century, White Hill had several owners. David Bruce, an inventor, created a typesetting machine in 1832 while living on the estate. Senator Isaac Field then purchased White Hill in 1847. Another inventor, Joseph Mayer, purchased the home in 1885 and developed several pottery techniques while living on the property. Several families lived, loved and died at White Hill but the 20th century would prove to attract even more people to the home.

In 1923, Heinrich and Katrina Glenk opened a German Restaurant at White Hill that catered to upscale clientele. They would remain for fifty years serving the people of the Borough of Fieldsboro before another family purchased the home. In 1991, the Stepan Company acquired White Hill but in 1999 they planned to demolish it. The Borough, in an effort to preserve history, bought White Hill and began the renovation process.

For well over 200 years, White Hill has been the home to doctors, inventors, entrepreneurs, Senators, and rum smugglers during the days of prohibition. A family home, a bordello, a speakeasy, a restaurant…the stories that White Hill Mansion can tell are secretly hiding within its walls. The only way to hear them is to visit White Hill and listen for yourself!

What’s Included?
Your ghost hunt at White Hill Mansion includes the following:

Exclusive Overnight Access to the most haunted areas, including the “speakeasy”.
Group Séances.
Ghost Hunting Vigils.
Structured Vigils.
Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.
Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.
Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.
Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

12 People Interested
White Hill Mansion Ghost Hunt

White Hill Mansion Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 5th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday June 6th, 2021, 4:00AM

Friends of White Hill Mansion217 4th StFieldsboro, NJ08505 Location Map

White Hill Mansion is one of the most #haunted locations in New Jersey. The Paranormal Activity that has been witnessed, captured and experienced here will leave you breathless.

A mansion filled with Secrets!

One of the most haunted locations in New Jersey is a home that is nearly 300 years old. The White Hill Mansion has served as a family home, bordello, speakeasy, restaurant, and office building throughout the course of its existence. The spirits that still lurk in the shadows are eager to share three centuries worth of secrets and it doesn’t take much effort to get them to speak! As featured on Paranormal Lockdown, the haunting of White Hill Mansion is known as one of the most active locations in the Northeast!


Robert Field II inherited White Hill from his father in 1757. Robert was deeply involved in the Colonial Efforts leading up to the Revolutionary War and suddenly died under mysterious circumstances by drowning in the Delaware River in 1775. Mary, his wife, was left to run the property and raise three young children during the war. Her neighbors gladly sold her out as a rebel sympathizer leading the British to seize the property and use it as temporary quarters. The troops that occupied White Hill were the Hessian Army (the German troops hired by the British to assist in the war). One of the most common paranormal experiences is the German accented voice coming from the attic. Could it be one of the troops that made themselves at home during the Revolutionary War? Or perhaps its Heinrich Glenk who opened an upscale German restaurant with his wife at White Hill in 1923?

Many guests that visit White Hill talk about seeing a shadow figure that lurks around the basement. The figure creeps up next to people and then slinks back into the darkness. He has no respect for personal space. Others report disembodied voices, the sounds of children playing, footsteps up and down the stairs, EVPs (electronic voice phenomena) captured of a talkative woman who claims to be a former servant, a full-bodied apparition of a woman that many believe to be Mary Field watching sternly over the house, lights turning on and off of their own volition, objects being moved and hidden, a spirit that tugs on people’s clothing, a lighthearted prankster that enjoys toying with guests—the White Hill Mansion is a paranormal enthusiasts’ dream!

Over the centuries, White Hill Mansion has served as a family home, housed rum smugglers during prohibition, served as a bordello and speakeasy, a restaurant for over 50 years, an office building and now as a beacon of history full of secrets. During the restoration of White Hill, they conducted two archaeological digs that uncovered 30,000 artifacts leading to the speculation that the property itself was built on an ancient Native American settlement. With all of the history, it’s no wonder that White Hill is one of the most haunted houses in New Jersey.

The only question that remains—will you be brave enough to encounter the shadow man!?!?

Location History:

In 1722, Robert Field acquired White Hill and began construction of a home on the property. His son, aptly named Robert Field, inherited the property in 1757 where he lived with his wife and three small children before mysteriously drowning in the Delaware River on January 29, 1775. His wife, Mary, was left to run the 600 acres and raise their children during the tumultuous Revolutionary War.

Several of her neighbors were British sympathizers who jumped at the opportunity to curry favor with the Brits by reporting Mary as a colonialist. The rumors were supported by evidence of Captain Houston of the American Navy docking at White Hill and having dinner with Mary and her family. Of course, her support of the colonials led to the British Army seizing her home and searching the property for rebels in December of 1776. Captain Wrenden of the Hessian army (the German troops hired by the British during the Revolutionary War) decided to use White Hill as his temporary quarters and during his stay the Hessian Colonel Carl von Donop paid Mary a visit. Her hospitality, albeit forced upon her, helped to preserve White Hill throughout the duration of the war.

After the war, in 1779, Mary remarried Commodore Thomas Read who named White Hill his County Seat. The two lived happily together until his death at White Hill in 1788. Mary, widowed twice, remained in charge of the property until she signed it over to her son in 1797. Robert III’s ownership of the estate was short lived as he lost White Hill in 1804. His wife, Abigail nee Stockton, had a caring brother that wanted to preserve his family’s reputation. In doing so, he purchased White Hill and allowed Robert and Abigail to continue to live on the property.

Throughout the 19th century, White Hill had several owners. David Bruce, an inventor, created a typesetting machine in 1832 while living on the estate. Senator Isaac Field then purchased White Hill in 1847. Another inventor, Joseph Mayer, purchased the home in 1885 and developed several pottery techniques while living on the property. Several families lived, loved and died at White Hill but the 20th century would prove to attract even more people to the home.

In 1923, Heinrich and Katrina Glenk opened a German Restaurant at White Hill that catered to upscale clientele. They would remain for fifty years serving the people of the Borough of Fieldsboro before another family purchased the home. In 1991, the Stepan Company acquired White Hill but in 1999 they planned to demolish it. The Borough, in an effort to preserve history, bought White Hill and began the renovation process.

For well over 200 years, White Hill has been the home to doctors, inventors, entrepreneurs, Senators, and rum smugglers during the days of prohibition. A family home, a bordello, a speakeasy, a restaurant…the stories that White Hill Mansion can tell are secretly hiding within its walls. The only way to hear them is to visit White Hill and listen for yourself!

What’s Included?
Your ghost hunt at White Hill Mansion includes the following:

Exclusive Overnight Access to the most haunted areas, including the “speakeasy”.
Group Séances.
Ghost Hunting Vigils.
Structured Vigils.
Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.
Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.
Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.
Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

14 People Interested
Missouri State Penitentiary Ghost Hunt

Missouri State Penitentiary Ghost Hunt

Friday June 11th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday June 12th, 2021, 6:00AM

Missouri State Penitentiary115 Lafayette StreetJefferson City, MO65101 Location Map

The #haunted Missouri State Penitentiary is a haven for the paranormal. Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location will definitely test your nerve as you explore this vast and daunting location.

We have exclusive access to Death Row, Solitary Confinement, and the infamous Gas Chamber where 40 inmates were executed.

Who are the lost souls that still make their presence known and are often seen wandering the dark halls of this abandoned penitentiary?

Missouri State Penitentiary is one of the most haunted locations we have ever investigated. You too can witness the truly compelling activity that occurs within these hallowed walls.

Your ghost hunt at Missouri State Penitentiary includes the following:

Psychic Medium.

Exclusive Access to the Gas Chamber.

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.
... See MoreSee Less

28 People Interested  ·  3 People Going
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Friday June 11th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday June 12th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

6 People Interested  ·  3 People Going
Missouri State Penitentiary Ghost Hunt

Missouri State Penitentiary Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 12th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday June 13th, 2021, 6:00AM

Missouri State Penitentiary115 Lafayette StreetJefferson City, MO65101 Location Map

The #haunted Missouri State Penitentiary is a haven for the paranormal. Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location will definitely test your nerve as you explore this vast and daunting location.

We have exclusive access to Death Row, Solitary Confinement, and the infamous Gas Chamber where 40 inmates were executed.

Who are the lost souls that still make their presence known and are often seen wandering the dark halls of this abandoned penitentiary?

Missouri State Penitentiary is one of the most haunted locations we have ever investigated. You too can witness the truly compelling activity that occurs within these hallowed walls.

Your ghost hunt at Missouri State Penitentiary includes the following:

Psychic Medium.

Exclusive Access to the Gas Chamber.

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.
... See MoreSee Less

57 People Interested  ·  5 People Going
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 12th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday June 13th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

6 People Interested
Bobby Mackeys Ghost Hunt

Bobby Mackeys Ghost Hunt

Thursday June 17th, 2021, 8:30PM - Friday June 18th, 2021, 3:00AM

Bobby Mackey's Music World44 Licking PikeWilder, KY Location Map

Reported to be one of America's Most Haunted locations in Kentucky. This location was featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures. The Paranormal Activity that has been witnessed and captured here will send a shiver down your spine.

When the lights go out and you venture downstairs you will soon understand that this location has a dark, sinister past. Many paranormal teams and television programs have investigated this Honky Tonk and few have left without the firm belief that the basement holds the gateway to hell!

Is This Paranormal Only In Your State Ghost hunting #haunted

The harrowing history eludes to the blood of innocence soiling the earth creating an unholy presence that lurks in the shadows. The evidence captured, the paranormal occurrences witnessed and experiences of investigators tell a story of the twisted and dark past.A staircase near the well of the old slaughterhouse has been deemed "the stairs that lead to nowhere" by investigators and phantom footsteps are often heard by those who dare to venture into the basement.

Testimonies of a former caretaker that resided in the apartment upstairs speak of demonic possession. The incident was so harrowing that the Church intervened and performed an exorcism in the club!

Patron's of Bobby Mackey's have reported experiencing suffocating heat, flying trashcans and hearing a man chanting in Latin, "Die game, die game." (English translation: dying well/good)

Janet Mackey (Bobby's wife) claimed to have been overcome by the scent of roses in the basement (associated with the ghost of Johanna and her perfume), grabbed around the waist, picked up, thrown down and pushed down the stairs by force by something that resembled sketches of murderer Alonzo Walling, screaming, "Get out! Get out!" After this traumatic experience, she refused to set foot in the club.

This location is one that promises not to disappoint. From the land's association with Satanic Cultic practices to the murder and death that has tragically occurred time and again - the spirits are restless and ready to share their stories. The only question that remains - will you be brave enough to venture into the gateway to hell?

Much of the history of Bobby Mackey’s Music World is wrapped in legend and folklore but most who visit this Honky Tonk can attest to the strange happenings in this gateway to hell.

As it is told, the land once played host to a slaughterhouse around the 1850’s. More than half a century before Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle exposed the unsanitary and inhumane practices of such places – the carnage was simply dumped into a well in the basement. Many have looked at this act as unintentional but still very bloody animal sacrifice.

After the closing of the slaughterhouse in the 1890’s the legend takes a darker turn. The rumor that has the most legs is that a Satanic Cult occupied the land sacrificing more than just animals.

Probably the most horrifying account is of 22-year-old Pearl Bryan who was found murdered in 1896. Her headless body was found in a field near the land where the George Dobson Distillery now sat.

When Pearl discovered she was pregnant, her boyfriend Scott Jackson and his roommate Alonzo Walling attempted to abort the fetus on their own. After all, a student at the Ohio College of Dental Surgery would surely know how to perform the procedure, right? Wrong. As you can imagine, things did not go so well and Pearl died. They attempted to cover up their actions by decapitating her and abandoning her body. Many believe the only reason they were caught is because they didn’t remove her shoes.

During the 1920’s a new building was erected on the land. Prohibition was in full force and the people of Wilder, Kentucky had their own dark little speakeasy. As with most of these establishments, the end of prohibition did not bring an end to the mobsters that had taken advantage of an easy market.

In 1933, E.A. “Buck” Brady purchased the club and renamed it “Primrose.” His casino’s success was noticed by the mob of Cincinnati who tried to muscle their way into his establishment. Brady refused to be intimidated, pulling a gun on Albert “Red” Masterson. Soon after he was charged with attempted murder and left his business in 1946.

The Cleveland Syndicate reopened the location as a nightclub in the 1950’s called the “Latin Quarter.” His daughter, Johanna is rumored to have fallen in love with and become pregnant by one of the nightclub singers, Robert Randall. The young lovers had intended to run off together but her father refused to allow the romance to happen and had the young man killed. Johanna, mourning her lovers’ death, poisoned her father and then took her own life in the basement.

The nightclub was closed in the late 70’s after several fatal shootings. But later the same year, Bobby Mackey, a young up and coming country singer, bought the building and so began the legendary journey of Bobby Mackey’s Music World.
... See MoreSee Less

79 People Interested  ·  7 People Going
Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Friday June 18th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday June 19th, 2021, 4:00AM

308 Lee Rd, Mineral Wells, TX 76067, United States Location Map

Our ghost hunts at the #haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

Your ghost hunt at the Beach Army Hospital includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks

History:

In the middle of a beautiful field in Mineral Wells, Texas stands an ominous building.

At over 90,000 square feet, the structure looks like something out of a James Bond movie. With more than three floors, this imposing building houses a two-level basement and more rooms than your mind will let you imagine. It is truly massive.

You have arrived at the Beach Army Hospital on the former Camp Wolters site.

With World War II still raging, Camp Wolter was ordered to serve as an infantry replacement training center on March 19th, 1941.

Camp Wolters housed as many as 30,000 soldiers at peak, thus requiring a centralized hospital for the six troop staging areas.

The original US Army hospital construction was a frame structure covered with gypsum board walls on the interior, and with metal siding on the exterior.

The hospital was equipped to handle 750 patients.

When Camp Wolters was transferred to the Air Force base, these buildings were in desperate need of very expensive repairs to bring them up to usable standard. At that time, the camp was renamed Wolters Air Force Base.

The Air Force requested and received funds to build a new hospital, and this is when the Beach Army Hospital became the building that it is today.

Construction started in the 1950’s and by March 29th, 1957 the Beach Army Hospital opened its doors as a medical institution. At a cost of $2.5 million dollars, which would equate to $9.3 million in today’s money.

This hospital was the first of its kind to specialize in aviation medicine for the United States Military.

It was designed to handle 100 patients, with an expansion capability for 200 patients. The facility was equipped with surgical, delivery, lavatory, kitchen and examination rooms.

Soon after completion, the United States Army gained control of the camp and it became the Primary Helicopter Center where all rotary wing pilots received their primary flight training.

Later – in June of 1963, the camp was renamed Fort Wolters.

Countless men, women, and families of the United States Military walked its halls and long corridors, whilst those that were hospitalized called it their home.

This left a permanent imprint on the building and on American History.

Shortly after 1970 this massive structure closed its doors.

Paranormal:

Our ghost hunts at the haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

The hospital has laid dormant and untouched for its nearly 50 years of abandonment. The aesthetics remain as well as those who once inhabited the property!

Make no mistake about it…….the paranormal activity that plagues this former hospital can be intense.

The unseen occupants taunt all those who visit, with whispers in ears, unpleasant touches, and faint smells of the past!

Due to the satanic worship, and “doors” opened, the paranormal experiences have intensified.

Around every corner and on every floor that you climb, you will be welcomed with the residual energy. The imprinted energy into the abandoned hospital beds, wheelchairs, and the morgue will last forever!

However, don’t let this fool you. The spirits are beyond intelligent and will interact in unbeknownst ways!

Are you ready for the unknown, and an adventure like no other?
... See MoreSee Less

16 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Old Montana State Prison Ghost Hunt

Old Montana State Prison Ghost Hunt

Friday June 18th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday June 19th, 2021, 5:00AM

Old Montana Prison Complex1106 Main StDeer Lodge, MT59722 Location Map

Old Montana Prison Ghost Hunt | Deer Lodge, Montana | We have exclusive overnight access to this very #haunted location in Montana.

This location was featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures

We have access to the most haunted areas including the Death Tower, The Administration House, The Clark Theatre, Maximum Security, The Hole and The Chapel.

The darkness, pain and sinister suffering is still embedded into the walls of this very haunted prison. Old Montana State Prison has a haunted reputation that will send a shiver down your spine.

On April 16th, 1959, Jerry Myles and Lee Smart led twelve inmates in a riot which left Deputy Warden Ted Rothe dead. They took eighteen prison employees and five stool pigeon inmates as hostages, soaked rags with flammable liquid and threatened to burn them alive.

After thirty-six hours of mounting tension, Warden Floyd Powell implemented a daring rescue attempt. The National Guard fired a bazooka at the tower where the ringleaders were headquartered. Meanwhile, a team of men burst through the door in the west wall, crossed the yard, and entered the Cell House, freeing the hostages.

Myles and Smart were found dead of an apparent murder-suicide at the top floor of the tower, is it these two lovers that still haunt the Death Tower?

Your time will be spent ghost hunting in the most active areas and we have exclusive overnight access to the main key areas of this prison.

Full bodied apparitions, disembodied voices and items being thrown is just a small amount of the reported paranormal experiences captured here.

Will you be brave enough to venture a lone vigil in the depths of darkness that swirl around this former prison?!?

Like other fledgling territories in the 19th century American West, Montana had become wild when the gold rush attracted not only those wishing to find their fortunes, but also thieves, gamblers, and murderers. For several years following the gold discoveries of 1862, the Montana Vigilantes took it upon themselves to punish these many offenders in the lawless land of Montana. Finally, seeing a need for more organized forms of law enforcement, the Montana Territorial Legislature requested funds for a prison during its winter session of 1866-67. The United States Congress agreed that the territory needed a prison, approved the request for funding, and Deer Lodge was chosen for the site of the new Territorial Prison.

However, they soon found that the funding was inadequate causing revisions to the plans and many delays. Construction finally began in the spring of 1870 with convict labor, and the prison finally received its first convict on July 2, 1871.

Almost from the beginning, the prison was deemed inadequate and overcrowded, a condition that would result in slow, but continual construction at the prison for the next fifty years. When Montana became the forty-first state on November 8, 1889, the prison became Montana's responsibility. Finding it expensive to operate, the Board of Prison Commissioners contracted out the entire Prison operation in 1890. Colonel Thomas McTague and Frank Conley of Deer Lodge received the contract, which paid them seventy cents per prisoner per day.

Frank Conley became the new warden, a post that he would continue to hold until 1921. Over the next thirty years, Conley shaped the philosophy and appearance of the prison. Believing the prisoners should work, Conley began to update the prison by first replacing its twelve-foot wooden fence with the massive sandstone wall in 1893. Four and a half feet thick, the wall formed a solid perimeter for the prison. He also began to build a new log cell house to reduce the prison crowding.

As a further measure to reduce crowding, put the prisoners to work, and generate income from the prison, outside prison camps were established where prisoners would live and be "hired out” for both public and private work. This worked so well that by the late 1890’s approximately one-third of the prisoners worked outside the prison. At these camps, which housed about 75 prisoners each, inmates enjoyed a relatively high degree of freedom with neither chains nor cells restricting them. However, "outside work” was a privilege, and the slightest infraction of the rules would immediately send a prisoner back behind prison walls.

By the second decade of the twentieth century, about fifty percent of the inmates were working outside the penitentiary, traveling throughout Montana erecting numerous state buildings, paving more than five hundred miles of roads, and working on eleven different ranches that provided food for state-owned institutions.

In 1908, the prison witnessed one of its most tragic events when two prisoners by the names of George Rock and William Hayes attempted to escape. Fleeing from the Federal Building, their failed attempt resulted in the death of Deputy Warden John Robinson and Warden Frank Conley was required to get 103 stitches in his back and neck from stab wounds he received from the inmates. As a result, George Rock was hanged inside the prison yard that very year, and William Hayes met a similar fate the following year. They were the only inmates to be executed in the prison.

Not all the inmates were so violent however, and one was down right liked by the guards and prisoners. At the age of 40, Pete Eitner was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in 1918.

A model prisoner, he was assigned to tend to the prison turkeys and soon garnered the nickname of "Turkey Pete." As he aged, he began to lose some of his mental facilities and when a man stopped one day to admire his turkeys, Eitner sold him the entire flock for 25 cents each. This ended his turkey tending days, but that was ok, because he soon fantasized a new "job" as the owner and administrator of the prison. Prison officials humored him, "allowing" Eitner to "run" the prison from his cell. Fake checks were printed for him, with which he paid the prison expenses and payroll. He would also tell anyone who would listen that he had the coffee crop in Brazil one year, sold pink alligators, ships to the navy, and grasshopper legs to Fidel Castro.

When Turkey Pete died in 1967 at age 89, his cell (#1) was retired. His funeral was the only one ever held within the walls of the prison. Today, Cell #1 displays photos of Turkey Pete, as well as his few belongings.

Inside the prison walls, construction also continued with the building of a women’s prison, additional dormitories for the men, a store building, laundry, and dining room. In 1919, a 1,000 seat prison theater was built with funding donated by Senator William A. Clark, Jr.

Protests from labor unions and security concerns put an end to outside work in the 1920s; however, food production continued at the thirty-thousand-acre prison-owned ranch. Work inside the prison continued in various industries including cobbler and upholstery shops, and a garment industry that made clothes for state wards. A state license plate factory began production in the late 1920’s.

Though Conley’s administration made drastic improvements to the prison, it continually suffered from overcrowding through the decades.

On April 16, 1959, the prison suffered a major riot when two inmates by the names of Jerry Myles and Lee Smart, Jr. led some 12 inmates in an escape attempt. In the melee, Deputy Warden Theodore Rothe was shot and killed, and Warden Powell was temporarily held hostage.

The hostages were held for three days while the riot raged on. After the National Guard was brought in, the two ringleaders died in a murder-suicide, When Myles shot Smart and then turned the gun on himself.

Finally, the old and overcrowded prison was closed In 1979, and its prisoners moved to a new facility, five miles west of Deer Lodge.
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23 People Interested
Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Friday June 18th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday June 19th, 2021, 4:00AM

314 NW 4th St, Mineral Wells, TX 76067-4939, United States Location Map

The #haunted Nazareth Sanatorium, in #MineralWells #Texas, is a haven for the paranormal!

Our #Ghost Hunting events at The Nazareth Hospital and former Sanatorium will push your ghost hunting nerves to new limits.

We have exclusive access to this haunted location, including access to the 5th floor.

Just make sure you don’t leave before 2am, as the witching hour is waiting for you!

-

Event Start Time: 8:30pm

Event Finish Time: 4:00am

-

Your ghost hunt at Nazareth Sanatorium includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

-

The sun is shining, and the year is 1931.

The residents of Mineral Wells had no idea the Holy Sisters of Nazareth were making their way to this “Crazy” Haunted town to take up a life that would make a name for this small town in Texas.

With Minerals Wells already known for their “Crazy Water”, yes you read that right, this historic town has something so special in the water that hundreds of thousands of visitor’s flock here yearly.

And before you think that the “crazy water” is a myth, you simply have no idea…when you visit, and you will, make sure you take some home with you and find out why it is so special.

Let’s go back to 1931.

With the sisters climbing 7 floors, 14 flights and 126 steps, they settled into the top of this 46-room hospital, with an entourage of doctors and janitor.

Who knew that many of them would spend their final days in the Nazareth Hospital caring for the sick and those in need.

Many of them were unaware of what was about to unfold over the forthcoming years, and how much they would be needed.

The Nazareth Hospital would become a beacon of hope in Mineral Wells and no one could have predicted the events that would embed into these walls and remain unexplained.

Welcome to the Nazareth Hospital, sorry we meant, the Haunted Nazareth, and former Sanatorium Hospital.

The Holy Sisters bought the building for about $135,000 which would equate to more than $2 million today. The sisters were unaware that the land was used as a Bordello, and on that subject we will leave that part right here….

It housed its own crematorium which still sits on the site today, which was last used around the 1940’s – 1950’s.

You will soon understand that love and care was a fundamental part of the hospital.

In the 1960’s the hospital added on the name “sanatorium”.

This mighty building was a beacon of hope, protection and love, and it even survived two major fires!

Every inch of this hospital had a purpose, and every floor was used to its full potential.

The 1st floor housed Tuberculosis, Polio and Psychiatric Patients.

The 2nd floor was originally designated for administrative purposes.

The 3rd floor was used as the Chapel and patient rooms.

The 4th floor was the labor and delivery room.

The 5th floor was the surgical units.

The 6th floor Nun’s quarters

The 7th floor was occupied by the Priest, until he was relocated to the property behind the crematorium.

It is no wonder why the Nazareth Hospital has a haunted reputation, those very unique people who worked here still haunt this building, and those unfortunate souls who lost their lives still wander the very empty corridors.

Do you have what it takes to walk in the shadows of those departed?
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42 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Wilson Castle Ghost Hunt

Wilson Castle Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 19th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday June 20th, 2021, 4:00AM

Wilson CastleProctor, VT Location Map

As you navigate the long drive you are instantly taken back to the year 1885.

You won’t see men in top hats, nor women in long gowns, but you will see why this Castle is a purely incredible sight to behold and is one of the most visited historic locations in Vermont.

You will also understand why the year 1885 still lives on.

The stunning turrets, stained glassed windows, and massive wooden doors are the things that fairytales are made of. This however, is not the wonderland you were expecting!

Harrowing paranormal experiences can quickly turn fairytales into nightmares.

Wilson Castle being one of the most expensive homes ever build in Vermont, captivates all with its ever so impressive details. One-of-a-kind fireplace, wood fixtures, and imported fixtures from around the world are imbedded in every inch of this exquisite castle.

Now, pull up a chair and let us tell you how this became known as Wilson Castle.

In 1885, Doctor John Johnson with wife, Sarah, decided it was time to build a house as beautiful as their family! He had strict ideas and instructions on how this home must be designed.

We are still unsure where his wonderous vision came from! Some believe it’s his English born aristocrat wife, who spent many years visiting English castles, while others think he just wanted the best!

Doctor Johnson did not peddle around the idea, but instead went full speed ahead. He started ordering bricks from Europe, foreign Laborers, and materials from around the world!

The goal was to build a 32-room castle which would include a music room, gallery, two dining rooms, grand parlor, hidden ballroom on the third floor, and many bedrooms for his lavished guests.

The castle was built from their dreams, which would soon be crushed. Sarah’s family decided to stop providing financial help, which caused many issues.

Devastated Doctor Johnson fled his home, leaving Sarah and his son behind. This in turn, forced, Sarah to sell the castle of her dreams. Sarah ended up moving to Boston, and never heard from or saw John again.

Passing from owner to owner, the castle finally ended up in Colonel Wilsons possession in 1940. Colonel Wilson created the name Wilson Castle, which it is known as today.

After his death, his granddaughter wanted to share this historic building with the world and created Wilson Castle Museum.

Paranormal:

Our Ghost Hunts at Wilson Castle in Proctor, Vermont satisfy the intriguing lore of one of the most haunted locations in Vermont.

When we talk about haunted locations, Wilson Castle is on the list of places you have to visit!

Wilson Castle’s well-known hauntings bring paranormal investigators searching for the other side, and when the lights go out this castle opens its veil to the other side.

The embedded residual energy seems to be in every room, and wherever you venture off to, you are constantly followed by the unseen residents of the castle.

A woman’s voice, cries and groans have been heard coming from upstairs, and many ghost hunters have seen the reflection of a woman wearing a black mourning dress in the mirror from Sarah’s former room.

Items move on their own, apparitions have been sighted, disembodied voices coming from empty rooms, doors closing, cold spots, and much more.

This is just a fraction of what has been witnessed and reported at this amazing location.

The spirits that still roam this haunted castle truly do let their presence be known.

Are you ready to explore the haunted Wilson Castle?

What's Included?


Your ghost hunt at Wilson Castle includes the following:

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
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98 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Old Montana State Prison Ghost Hunt

Old Montana State Prison Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 19th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday June 20th, 2021, 5:00AM

Old Montana Prison Complex1106 Main StDeer Lodge, MT59722 Location Map

Old Montana Prison Ghost Hunt | Deer Lodge, Montana | We have exclusive overnight access to this very #haunted location in Montana.

This location was featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures

We have access to the most haunted areas including the Death Tower, The Administration House, The Clark Theatre, Maximum Security, The Hole and The Chapel.

The darkness, pain and sinister suffering is still embedded into the walls of this very haunted prison. Old Montana State Prison has a haunted reputation that will send a shiver down your spine.

On April 16th, 1959, Jerry Myles and Lee Smart led twelve inmates in a riot which left Deputy Warden Ted Rothe dead. They took eighteen prison employees and five stool pigeon inmates as hostages, soaked rags with flammable liquid and threatened to burn them alive.

After thirty-six hours of mounting tension, Warden Floyd Powell implemented a daring rescue attempt. The National Guard fired a bazooka at the tower where the ringleaders were headquartered. Meanwhile, a team of men burst through the door in the west wall, crossed the yard, and entered the Cell House, freeing the hostages.

Myles and Smart were found dead of an apparent murder-suicide at the top floor of the tower, is it these two lovers that still haunt the Death Tower?

Your time will be spent ghost hunting in the most active areas and we have exclusive overnight access to the main key areas of this prison.

Full bodied apparitions, disembodied voices and items being thrown is just a small amount of the reported paranormal experiences captured here.

Will you be brave enough to venture a lone vigil in the depths of darkness that swirl around this former prison?!?

Like other fledgling territories in the 19th century American West, Montana had become wild when the gold rush attracted not only those wishing to find their fortunes, but also thieves, gamblers, and murderers. For several years following the gold discoveries of 1862, the Montana Vigilantes took it upon themselves to punish these many offenders in the lawless land of Montana. Finally, seeing a need for more organized forms of law enforcement, the Montana Territorial Legislature requested funds for a prison during its winter session of 1866-67. The United States Congress agreed that the territory needed a prison, approved the request for funding, and Deer Lodge was chosen for the site of the new Territorial Prison.

However, they soon found that the funding was inadequate causing revisions to the plans and many delays. Construction finally began in the spring of 1870 with convict labor, and the prison finally received its first convict on July 2, 1871.

Almost from the beginning, the prison was deemed inadequate and overcrowded, a condition that would result in slow, but continual construction at the prison for the next fifty years. When Montana became the forty-first state on November 8, 1889, the prison became Montana's responsibility. Finding it expensive to operate, the Board of Prison Commissioners contracted out the entire Prison operation in 1890. Colonel Thomas McTague and Frank Conley of Deer Lodge received the contract, which paid them seventy cents per prisoner per day.

Frank Conley became the new warden, a post that he would continue to hold until 1921. Over the next thirty years, Conley shaped the philosophy and appearance of the prison. Believing the prisoners should work, Conley began to update the prison by first replacing its twelve-foot wooden fence with the massive sandstone wall in 1893. Four and a half feet thick, the wall formed a solid perimeter for the prison. He also began to build a new log cell house to reduce the prison crowding.

As a further measure to reduce crowding, put the prisoners to work, and generate income from the prison, outside prison camps were established where prisoners would live and be "hired out” for both public and private work. This worked so well that by the late 1890’s approximately one-third of the prisoners worked outside the prison. At these camps, which housed about 75 prisoners each, inmates enjoyed a relatively high degree of freedom with neither chains nor cells restricting them. However, "outside work” was a privilege, and the slightest infraction of the rules would immediately send a prisoner back behind prison walls.

By the second decade of the twentieth century, about fifty percent of the inmates were working outside the penitentiary, traveling throughout Montana erecting numerous state buildings, paving more than five hundred miles of roads, and working on eleven different ranches that provided food for state-owned institutions.

In 1908, the prison witnessed one of its most tragic events when two prisoners by the names of George Rock and William Hayes attempted to escape. Fleeing from the Federal Building, their failed attempt resulted in the death of Deputy Warden John Robinson and Warden Frank Conley was required to get 103 stitches in his back and neck from stab wounds he received from the inmates. As a result, George Rock was hanged inside the prison yard that very year, and William Hayes met a similar fate the following year. They were the only inmates to be executed in the prison.

Not all the inmates were so violent however, and one was down right liked by the guards and prisoners. At the age of 40, Pete Eitner was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in 1918.

A model prisoner, he was assigned to tend to the prison turkeys and soon garnered the nickname of "Turkey Pete." As he aged, he began to lose some of his mental facilities and when a man stopped one day to admire his turkeys, Eitner sold him the entire flock for 25 cents each. This ended his turkey tending days, but that was ok, because he soon fantasized a new "job" as the owner and administrator of the prison. Prison officials humored him, "allowing" Eitner to "run" the prison from his cell. Fake checks were printed for him, with which he paid the prison expenses and payroll. He would also tell anyone who would listen that he had the coffee crop in Brazil one year, sold pink alligators, ships to the navy, and grasshopper legs to Fidel Castro.

When Turkey Pete died in 1967 at age 89, his cell (#1) was retired. His funeral was the only one ever held within the walls of the prison. Today, Cell #1 displays photos of Turkey Pete, as well as his few belongings.

Inside the prison walls, construction also continued with the building of a women’s prison, additional dormitories for the men, a store building, laundry, and dining room. In 1919, a 1,000 seat prison theater was built with funding donated by Senator William A. Clark, Jr.

Protests from labor unions and security concerns put an end to outside work in the 1920s; however, food production continued at the thirty-thousand-acre prison-owned ranch. Work inside the prison continued in various industries including cobbler and upholstery shops, and a garment industry that made clothes for state wards. A state license plate factory began production in the late 1920’s.

Though Conley’s administration made drastic improvements to the prison, it continually suffered from overcrowding through the decades.

On April 16, 1959, the prison suffered a major riot when two inmates by the names of Jerry Myles and Lee Smart, Jr. led some 12 inmates in an escape attempt. In the melee, Deputy Warden Theodore Rothe was shot and killed, and Warden Powell was temporarily held hostage.

The hostages were held for three days while the riot raged on. After the National Guard was brought in, the two ringleaders died in a murder-suicide, When Myles shot Smart and then turned the gun on himself.

Finally, the old and overcrowded prison was closed In 1979, and its prisoners moved to a new facility, five miles west of Deer Lodge.
... See MoreSee Less

4 People Interested
Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 19th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday June 20th, 2021, 4:00AM

314 NW 4th St, Mineral Wells, TX 76067-4939, United States Location Map

The #haunted Nazareth Sanatorium, in #MineralWells #Texas, is a haven for the paranormal!

Our #Ghost Hunting events at The Nazareth Hospital and former Sanatorium will push your ghost hunting nerves to new limits.

We have exclusive access to this haunted location, including access to the 5th floor.

Just make sure you don’t leave before 2am, as the witching hour is waiting for you!

-

Event Start Time: 8:30pm

Event Finish Time: 4:00am

-

Your ghost hunt at Nazareth Sanatorium includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

-

The sun is shining, and the year is 1931.

The residents of Mineral Wells had no idea the Holy Sisters of Nazareth were making their way to this “Crazy” Haunted town to take up a life that would make a name for this small town in Texas.

With Minerals Wells already known for their “Crazy Water”, yes you read that right, this historic town has something so special in the water that hundreds of thousands of visitor’s flock here yearly.

And before you think that the “crazy water” is a myth, you simply have no idea…when you visit, and you will, make sure you take some home with you and find out why it is so special.

Let’s go back to 1931.

With the sisters climbing 7 floors, 14 flights and 126 steps, they settled into the top of this 46-room hospital, with an entourage of doctors and janitor.

Who knew that many of them would spend their final days in the Nazareth Hospital caring for the sick and those in need.

Many of them were unaware of what was about to unfold over the forthcoming years, and how much they would be needed.

The Nazareth Hospital would become a beacon of hope in Mineral Wells and no one could have predicted the events that would embed into these walls and remain unexplained.

Welcome to the Nazareth Hospital, sorry we meant, the Haunted Nazareth, and former Sanatorium Hospital.

The Holy Sisters bought the building for about $135,000 which would equate to more than $2 million today. The sisters were unaware that the land was used as a Bordello, and on that subject we will leave that part right here….

It housed its own crematorium which still sits on the site today, which was last used around the 1940’s – 1950’s.

You will soon understand that love and care was a fundamental part of the hospital.

In the 1960’s the hospital added on the name “sanatorium”.

This mighty building was a beacon of hope, protection and love, and it even survived two major fires!

Every inch of this hospital had a purpose, and every floor was used to its full potential.

The 1st floor housed Tuberculosis, Polio and Psychiatric Patients.

The 2nd floor was originally designated for administrative purposes.

The 3rd floor was used as the Chapel and patient rooms.

The 4th floor was the labor and delivery room.

The 5th floor was the surgical units.

The 6th floor Nun’s quarters

The 7th floor was occupied by the Priest, until he was relocated to the property behind the crematorium.

It is no wonder why the Nazareth Hospital has a haunted reputation, those very unique people who worked here still haunt this building, and those unfortunate souls who lost their lives still wander the very empty corridors.

Do you have what it takes to walk in the shadows of those departed?
... See MoreSee Less

13 People Interested
Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 19th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday June 20th, 2021, 4:00AM

308 Lee Rd, Mineral Wells, TX 76067, United States Location Map

Our ghost hunts at the #haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

Your ghost hunt at the Beach Army Hospital includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks

History:

In the middle of a beautiful field in Mineral Wells, Texas stands an ominous building.

At over 90,000 square feet, the structure looks like something out of a James Bond movie. With more than three floors, this imposing building houses a two-level basement and more rooms than your mind will let you imagine. It is truly massive.

You have arrived at the Beach Army Hospital on the former Camp Wolters site.

With World War II still raging, Camp Wolter was ordered to serve as an infantry replacement training center on March 19th, 1941.

Camp Wolters housed as many as 30,000 soldiers at peak, thus requiring a centralized hospital for the six troop staging areas.

The original US Army hospital construction was a frame structure covered with gypsum board walls on the interior, and with metal siding on the exterior.

The hospital was equipped to handle 750 patients.

When Camp Wolters was transferred to the Air Force base, these buildings were in desperate need of very expensive repairs to bring them up to usable standard. At that time, the camp was renamed Wolters Air Force Base.

The Air Force requested and received funds to build a new hospital, and this is when the Beach Army Hospital became the building that it is today.

Construction started in the 1950’s and by March 29th, 1957 the Beach Army Hospital opened its doors as a medical institution. At a cost of $2.5 million dollars, which would equate to $9.3 million in today’s money.

This hospital was the first of its kind to specialize in aviation medicine for the United States Military.

It was designed to handle 100 patients, with an expansion capability for 200 patients. The facility was equipped with surgical, delivery, lavatory, kitchen and examination rooms.

Soon after completion, the United States Army gained control of the camp and it became the Primary Helicopter Center where all rotary wing pilots received their primary flight training.

Later – in June of 1963, the camp was renamed Fort Wolters.

Countless men, women, and families of the United States Military walked its halls and long corridors, whilst those that were hospitalized called it their home.

This left a permanent imprint on the building and on American History.

Shortly after 1970 this massive structure closed its doors.

Paranormal:

Our ghost hunts at the haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

The hospital has laid dormant and untouched for its nearly 50 years of abandonment. The aesthetics remain as well as those who once inhabited the property!

Make no mistake about it…….the paranormal activity that plagues this former hospital can be intense.

The unseen occupants taunt all those who visit, with whispers in ears, unpleasant touches, and faint smells of the past!

Due to the satanic worship, and “doors” opened, the paranormal experiences have intensified.

Around every corner and on every floor that you climb, you will be welcomed with the residual energy. The imprinted energy into the abandoned hospital beds, wheelchairs, and the morgue will last forever!

However, don’t let this fool you. The spirits are beyond intelligent and will interact in unbeknownst ways!

Are you ready for the unknown, and an adventure like no other?
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2 People Interested
The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

Friday June 25th, 2021, 8:00PM - Saturday June 26th, 2021, 3:00AM

Squirrel Cage Jail of Pottawattamie County, Iowa226 Pearl StCouncil Bluffs, IA51503 Location Map

The #haunted Squirrel Cage Jail has been featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures. The Squirrel Jail in Iowa is one of the most haunted jails. It was also home to the "Jake Bird" the evil serial killer who took the lives of 44 victims!

Are you ready to explore a unique piece of history and find out who may still dwell within the confines of this unusual lockup?

Constructed in 1885 and in operation as a jail until 1969, the Squirrel Cage Jail offers guests a chance to experience what life may have been like doing time (or working in) a “human-rotary” style jail. One of only three such jails of still in existence, this strange building design surely holds secrets from the past.

Your ghost hunt at Squirrel Cage Jail includes the following:

Access to the most haunted areas of this prison,
Smaller Group Sizes,
45 Minute History tour,
Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present),
Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators,
Lone Vigils,
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers,
Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water

Paranormal:

Not surprisingly, there are a number of reports of paranormal activity within the structure, some dating back to when the jail was still in operation. It is said a jailer from the 1950s named Bill Foster refused to use the fourth floor as his living quarters because of “strange goings-on up there,” which including footsteps when no one was up there and odd sensations when he went upstairs to investigate.

One former tour guide has claimed to have seen the spirit of J.M. Carter, the gentleman who supervised the building’s construction in 1885. He was reportedly the first resident of the fourth floor living quarters. Perhaps he has stuck around to keep an eye on things to this day.

Others have recounted seeing a full-bodied apparition, also on the top floor, who they believe may be another former jailer named Otto Gufath. Still another person stated she saw the ghost of what appeared to be a sad little girl dressed in gray, sitting inside a cell which was completely inaccessible at the time.

Over the years, visitors and employees alike have described a number of possible paranormal happenings, including feeling like they are being watched, having their clothes tugged on, hearing disembodied voices, doors opening and closing by themselves, seeing strange lights and hearing odd, unexplainable noises.

Spend some time with us and see if you can discover which spirits may still be lingering here, trying to communicate with the living – and what they might have to say about the conditions they endured at the Squirrel Cage Jail.

Location History:

In Council Bluffs, Iowa there stands a stately brick building erected in the late 1800s which houses a most remarkable lockup known as the Squirrel Cage Jail. One of only 18 of its kind built, this “human rotary’ jail is now only one of three still in existence, and the only one that stands three stories tall.

Constructed in 1885 under the supervision of J. M. Carter, the jail features 10 pie-shaped cells on each level, and each cell was meant to house between two – and some say up to six – prisoners at a time. This bizarre design was the brainchild of Indianapolis natives William H. Brown and Benjamin F. Haugh, and the intention was to “provide maximum security with minimum jailer attention,” – thus cutting down on the number of personnel needed to run the prison.

The jailer’s office, kitchen, trustee cells and women’s quarters were located in the front of the building on the first floor and living quarters for the jailer were on the fourth floor. The three levles of cells are placed on a central carousel or drum which was turned using a hand crank. The bars (or cage) are stationary and have only one opening on each floor. The cells were rotated using the hand crank until each one would line up with the cage opening so that prisoners could be accessed, but only one cell at a time.

Over time, the rotating carousel housing the cells became more difficult to turn and often became stuck, making it nearly impossible to get food or medical assistance to prisoners if needed. Inmates often suffered broken arms and legs when they would mistakenly (or deliberately) stick their limbs through the individual cell bars while the drum was being spun.

However, there are only four recorded deaths on the property during its more than 80-year run as a prison. One inmate died from and apparent heart attack. Another was found hanged in his cell. A third prisoner reportedly died when he fell three stories after trying to climb up the cage to carve his name in the ceiling. The fourth death was rumored to be that of an officer of the local police department who accidently shot himself during the confusion of the Farmer’s Holiday Association Strike in 1932 when 84 protesters were arrested and jailed.

The Squirrel Cage Jail was in operation until 1969, when it was deemed “unfit for human habitation.” In 1971, after the prison was shut down and its remaining prisoners moved to other facilities, it was obtained by the Council Bluffs Park Board. They were successful in getting the structure listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.The Historical Society of Pottawattamie County – who owns and operates the building today – headed the endeavor to protect the jail in 1977, and it is now a museum which offers a glimpse into the unique cultural and architectural history of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
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9 People Interested
The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

Friday June 25th, 2021, 8:00PM - Saturday June 26th, 2021, 3:00AM

Squirrel Cage Jail of Pottawattamie County, Iowa226 Pearl StCouncil Bluffs, IA51503 Location Map

The #haunted Squirrel Cage Jail has been featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures. The Squirrel Jail in Iowa is one of the most haunted jails. It was also home to the "Jake Bird" the evil serial killer who took the lives of 44 victims!

Are you ready to explore a unique piece of history and find out who may still dwell within the confines of this unusual lockup?

Constructed in 1885 and in operation as a jail until 1969, the Squirrel Cage Jail offers guests a chance to experience what life may have been like doing time (or working in) a “human-rotary” style jail. One of only three such jails of still in existence, this strange building design surely holds secrets from the past.

Your ghost hunt at Squirrel Cage Jail includes the following:

Access to the most haunted areas of this prison,
Smaller Group Sizes,
45 Minute History tour,
Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present),
Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators,
Lone Vigils,
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers,
Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water

Paranormal:

Not surprisingly, there are a number of reports of paranormal activity within the structure, some dating back to when the jail was still in operation. It is said a jailer from the 1950s named Bill Foster refused to use the fourth floor as his living quarters because of “strange goings-on up there,” which including footsteps when no one was up there and odd sensations when he went upstairs to investigate.

One former tour guide has claimed to have seen the spirit of J.M. Carter, the gentleman who supervised the building’s construction in 1885. He was reportedly the first resident of the fourth floor living quarters. Perhaps he has stuck around to keep an eye on things to this day.

Others have recounted seeing a full-bodied apparition, also on the top floor, who they believe may be another former jailer named Otto Gufath. Still another person stated she saw the ghost of what appeared to be a sad little girl dressed in gray, sitting inside a cell which was completely inaccessible at the time.

Over the years, visitors and employees alike have described a number of possible paranormal happenings, including feeling like they are being watched, having their clothes tugged on, hearing disembodied voices, doors opening and closing by themselves, seeing strange lights and hearing odd, unexplainable noises.

Spend some time with us and see if you can discover which spirits may still be lingering here, trying to communicate with the living – and what they might have to say about the conditions they endured at the Squirrel Cage Jail.

Location History:

In Council Bluffs, Iowa there stands a stately brick building erected in the late 1800s which houses a most remarkable lockup known as the Squirrel Cage Jail. One of only 18 of its kind built, this “human rotary’ jail is now only one of three still in existence, and the only one that stands three stories tall.

Constructed in 1885 under the supervision of J. M. Carter, the jail features 10 pie-shaped cells on each level, and each cell was meant to house between two – and some say up to six – prisoners at a time. This bizarre design was the brainchild of Indianapolis natives William H. Brown and Benjamin F. Haugh, and the intention was to “provide maximum security with minimum jailer attention,” – thus cutting down on the number of personnel needed to run the prison.

The jailer’s office, kitchen, trustee cells and women’s quarters were located in the front of the building on the first floor and living quarters for the jailer were on the fourth floor. The three levles of cells are placed on a central carousel or drum which was turned using a hand crank. The bars (or cage) are stationary and have only one opening on each floor. The cells were rotated using the hand crank until each one would line up with the cage opening so that prisoners could be accessed, but only one cell at a time.

Over time, the rotating carousel housing the cells became more difficult to turn and often became stuck, making it nearly impossible to get food or medical assistance to prisoners if needed. Inmates often suffered broken arms and legs when they would mistakenly (or deliberately) stick their limbs through the individual cell bars while the drum was being spun.

However, there are only four recorded deaths on the property during its more than 80-year run as a prison. One inmate died from and apparent heart attack. Another was found hanged in his cell. A third prisoner reportedly died when he fell three stories after trying to climb up the cage to carve his name in the ceiling. The fourth death was rumored to be that of an officer of the local police department who accidently shot himself during the confusion of the Farmer’s Holiday Association Strike in 1932 when 84 protesters were arrested and jailed.

The Squirrel Cage Jail was in operation until 1969, when it was deemed “unfit for human habitation.” In 1971, after the prison was shut down and its remaining prisoners moved to other facilities, it was obtained by the Council Bluffs Park Board. They were successful in getting the structure listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.The Historical Society of Pottawattamie County – who owns and operates the building today – headed the endeavor to protect the jail in 1977, and it is now a museum which offers a glimpse into the unique cultural and architectural history of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
... See MoreSee Less

2 People Interested
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Friday June 25th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday June 26th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

4 People Interested
Octagon Hall Ghost Hunt

Octagon Hall Ghost Hunt

Friday June 25th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday June 26th, 2021, 4:00AM

Octagon Hall Museum6040 Bowling Green RdFranklin, KY42134 Location Map

Our #haunted Ghost Hunts at Octagon Hall in #Kentucky, satisfies the most experienced paranormal investigator.

Grab your camera and flashlight, as the paranormal that you will capture at Octagon Hall will leave you breathless!

Octagon Hall is one of the most haunted places in the South. It has been featured on A&E, Travel Channel, Ghost Hunters and Haunted Collector.

It attracts Ghost Hunters from all over the country, and it is rumored to have over one hundred active spirits.

-

Your ghost hunt at Octagon Hall includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the haunted areas of this historic location.

Access to the onsite grounds (which includes the graveyard).

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.

-

Grab your camera and flashlight, as the paranormal that you will capture at Octagon Hall will leave you breathless!

Octagon Hall is one of the most haunted places in the South. It has been featured on A&E, Travel Channel, Ghost Hunters and Haunted Collector.

It attracts Ghost Hunters from all over the country, and it is rumored to have over one hundred active spirits.

As you walk through the original wooden doors, you are instantly taken back in time.

There is absolutely no escaping the paranormal that has been captured here. The ghostly evidence is shown for the world to see with photographic evidence scattered across the walls, and a simple google search will bring back hundreds of paranormal stories, captures and video footage, dating back years.

The recorded and captured evidence ranges from disembodied voices, cold spells, phantom smells that disappear as quickly as they arrived, to full blown apparitions.

The grounds that surround Octagon Hall are filled with spirits, from those that were buried onsite and there is a long list of haunted sightings that have been captured.

The spirits that still reside at Octagon Hall make their presences known day and night, and there is no escaping their touches.



Are you ready to enter one of the most haunted buildings in America?
... See MoreSee Less

70 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
Ashmore Estates Ghost Hunt

Ashmore Estates Ghost Hunt

Friday June 25th, 2021, 9:00PM - Saturday June 26th, 2021, 9:00AM

Ashmore Estates22645 E County Road 1050NAshmore, IL61912 Location Map

Ashmore Estates Overnight Ghost Hunt. One of the most #haunted locations in Illinois. This location was featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures and Only In Your State

This is a sleepover event.

Find out if the former residents of this former poor farm are still lingering in the dark corridors

Are you prepared to investigate one of the top three most haunted locations in Illinois? Do you have what it takes to encounter the spirits of those who may still be haunting the halls of this historic building? Join us, and see why a visit to Ashmore Estates may very well leave you feeling breathless…

Find out if the former residents of this former poor farm are still lingering in the dark corridors. Maybe you’ll face the spirits of past patients from the time when this building served as a psychiatric hospital. If you are brave enough to walk through the doors, you may find someone waiting to communicate with you.

The activity experienced on all three floors of this structure have caused some guests to flee, but other courageous souls have managed to stay through the night to recount their stories of being touched or awakened from their sleep by some unseen force.

Will you hear what some have reported as “cries of help” coming from seemingly empty rooms? Or maybe a whisper in your ear even though you think you’re alone? With over 100 reported deaths over the long history of this property, it’s no surprise that many people who stay here sense an incredible amount of residual energy remaining within these walls.

Wherever you venture throughout this location, you can be sure of one thing: you are never alone.

Location History:

Constructed as the new almshouse for the Coles County Poor Farm in 1916, the structure now known as Ashmore Estates cost just over $20,000 to build. It operated as poor house or county home until the late 1950s, serving the homeless, aged and mentally ill of the community who had no other place to go. It replaced the original almshouse which was built at the same location in 1857 but had fallen into disrepair and had become inhabitable. It was condemned in 1911 due to “vermin-infested walls,” “contaminated food,” as well as other factors.

From the time the construction of the new almshouse was completed in 1916 until February of 1959, countless people were forced to take up residence at this poor farm. And accordingly, many people died here. The county once maintained two small cemeteries nearby which hold the remains of between 60 and 100 people who were likely residents of the poor farm.

In 1959, Coles County sold the property to a corporation called Ashmore Estates, who opened and operated the building as a private psychiatric hospital. But by October of 1964, the hospital had to shut it doors due to the large amount of debt it had incurred. However, the building reopened as a facility to house state mental patients in 1965, and by 1968 there were 49 people in residence.

The property changed ownership again in July 1976 when Paul Swinford and Galen Martinie invested over $200,000 to bring the building up to code and to construct a modern addition to the original building. Construction began in 1977 but was not completed until sometime in the 1980s. Unfortunately, in 1986, all the residents had to be moved to other homes in the area because the financial losses incurred by the institution added up to more than $1.5 million. Swinford had partnered with Convalescent Management Associates so they could help manage the finances, but to no avail, as the county departments of Public Aid and Public Health would not issue the necessary licenses on a timely basis.

Up to 1990, the building sat abandoned, until once again Swinford, along with Corrections Corporation of America, attempted to resurrect it as a mental facility to treat and house teenage boys. But the zoning permit for the project was swiftly rejected. The building was once again abandoned. Soon, Ashmore Estates became notorious for rumors of being haunted, and became the subject of devastating vandalism.

Between 1998 and 2014, the property changed hands four times. Over the years, the various owners attempted to renovate and restore the building, and at one point it was used as a haunted house attraction. However, the current owners are credited with many of the safety and preservation improvements made to the building including a new roof, a kitchenette, and the installation of bathrooms. It is now being preserved for its historical significance and used for paranormal investigations.

So now that you know the long and complicated history of this intriguing place, are you ready to join us and find out which spirits may still be calling it home?

What’s Included?
Your ghost hunt at Ashmore Estates includes the following:
Group Séances
Ghost Hunting Vigils
Structured Vigils
Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters
Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils
Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca-Cola, Diet Coke and Bottled Water
Sleepover Event
Selection of snacks
... See MoreSee Less

17 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 26th, 2021, 8:00PM - Sunday June 27th, 2021, 3:00AM

Squirrel Cage Jail of Pottawattamie County, Iowa226 Pearl StCouncil Bluffs, IA51503 Location Map

The #haunted Squirrel Cage Jail has been featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures. The Squirrel Jail in Iowa is one of the most haunted jails. It was also home to the "Jake Bird" the evil serial killer who took the lives of 44 victims!

Are you ready to explore a unique piece of history and find out who may still dwell within the confines of this unusual lockup?

Constructed in 1885 and in operation as a jail until 1969, the Squirrel Cage Jail offers guests a chance to experience what life may have been like doing time (or working in) a “human-rotary” style jail. One of only three such jails of still in existence, this strange building design surely holds secrets from the past.

Your ghost hunt at Squirrel Cage Jail includes the following:

Access to the most haunted areas of this prison,
Smaller Group Sizes,
45 Minute History tour,
Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present),
Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators,
Lone Vigils,
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers,
Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water

Paranormal:

Not surprisingly, there are a number of reports of paranormal activity within the structure, some dating back to when the jail was still in operation. It is said a jailer from the 1950s named Bill Foster refused to use the fourth floor as his living quarters because of “strange goings-on up there,” which including footsteps when no one was up there and odd sensations when he went upstairs to investigate.

One former tour guide has claimed to have seen the spirit of J.M. Carter, the gentleman who supervised the building’s construction in 1885. He was reportedly the first resident of the fourth floor living quarters. Perhaps he has stuck around to keep an eye on things to this day.

Others have recounted seeing a full-bodied apparition, also on the top floor, who they believe may be another former jailer named Otto Gufath. Still another person stated she saw the ghost of what appeared to be a sad little girl dressed in gray, sitting inside a cell which was completely inaccessible at the time.

Over the years, visitors and employees alike have described a number of possible paranormal happenings, including feeling like they are being watched, having their clothes tugged on, hearing disembodied voices, doors opening and closing by themselves, seeing strange lights and hearing odd, unexplainable noises.

Spend some time with us and see if you can discover which spirits may still be lingering here, trying to communicate with the living – and what they might have to say about the conditions they endured at the Squirrel Cage Jail.

Location History:

In Council Bluffs, Iowa there stands a stately brick building erected in the late 1800s which houses a most remarkable lockup known as the Squirrel Cage Jail. One of only 18 of its kind built, this “human rotary’ jail is now only one of three still in existence, and the only one that stands three stories tall.

Constructed in 1885 under the supervision of J. M. Carter, the jail features 10 pie-shaped cells on each level, and each cell was meant to house between two – and some say up to six – prisoners at a time. This bizarre design was the brainchild of Indianapolis natives William H. Brown and Benjamin F. Haugh, and the intention was to “provide maximum security with minimum jailer attention,” – thus cutting down on the number of personnel needed to run the prison.

The jailer’s office, kitchen, trustee cells and women’s quarters were located in the front of the building on the first floor and living quarters for the jailer were on the fourth floor. The three levles of cells are placed on a central carousel or drum which was turned using a hand crank. The bars (or cage) are stationary and have only one opening on each floor. The cells were rotated using the hand crank until each one would line up with the cage opening so that prisoners could be accessed, but only one cell at a time.

Over time, the rotating carousel housing the cells became more difficult to turn and often became stuck, making it nearly impossible to get food or medical assistance to prisoners if needed. Inmates often suffered broken arms and legs when they would mistakenly (or deliberately) stick their limbs through the individual cell bars while the drum was being spun.

However, there are only four recorded deaths on the property during its more than 80-year run as a prison. One inmate died from and apparent heart attack. Another was found hanged in his cell. A third prisoner reportedly died when he fell three stories after trying to climb up the cage to carve his name in the ceiling. The fourth death was rumored to be that of an officer of the local police department who accidently shot himself during the confusion of the Farmer’s Holiday Association Strike in 1932 when 84 protesters were arrested and jailed.

The Squirrel Cage Jail was in operation until 1969, when it was deemed “unfit for human habitation.” In 1971, after the prison was shut down and its remaining prisoners moved to other facilities, it was obtained by the Council Bluffs Park Board. They were successful in getting the structure listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.The Historical Society of Pottawattamie County – who owns and operates the building today – headed the endeavor to protect the jail in 1977, and it is now a museum which offers a glimpse into the unique cultural and architectural history of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
... See MoreSee Less

13 People Interested
Octagon Hall Ghost Hunt

Octagon Hall Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 26th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday June 27th, 2021, 4:00AM

Octagon Hall Museum6040 Bowling Green RdFranklin, KY42134 Location Map

Our #haunted Ghost Hunts at Octagon Hall in #Kentucky, satisfies the most experienced paranormal investigator.

Grab your camera and flashlight, as the paranormal that you will capture at Octagon Hall will leave you breathless!

Octagon Hall is one of the most haunted places in the South. It has been featured on A&E, Travel Channel, Ghost Hunters and Haunted Collector.

It attracts Ghost Hunters from all over the country, and it is rumored to have over one hundred active spirits.

-

Your ghost hunt at Octagon Hall includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the haunted areas of this historic location.

Access to the onsite grounds (which includes the graveyard).

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.

-

Grab your camera and flashlight, as the paranormal that you will capture at Octagon Hall will leave you breathless!

Octagon Hall is one of the most haunted places in the South. It has been featured on A&E, Travel Channel, Ghost Hunters and Haunted Collector.

It attracts Ghost Hunters from all over the country, and it is rumored to have over one hundred active spirits.

As you walk through the original wooden doors, you are instantly taken back in time.

There is absolutely no escaping the paranormal that has been captured here. The ghostly evidence is shown for the world to see with photographic evidence scattered across the walls, and a simple google search will bring back hundreds of paranormal stories, captures and video footage, dating back years.

The recorded and captured evidence ranges from disembodied voices, cold spells, phantom smells that disappear as quickly as they arrived, to full blown apparitions.

The grounds that surround Octagon Hall are filled with spirits, from those that were buried onsite and there is a long list of haunted sightings that have been captured.

The spirits that still reside at Octagon Hall make their presences known day and night, and there is no escaping their touches.



Are you ready to enter one of the most haunted buildings in America?
... See MoreSee Less

133 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 26th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday June 27th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

2 People Interested
Ashmore Estates Ghost Hunt

Ashmore Estates Ghost Hunt

Saturday June 26th, 2021, 9:00PM - Sunday June 27th, 2021, 9:00AM

Ashmore Estates22645 E County Road 1050NAshmore, IL61912 Location Map

Ashmore Estates Overnight Ghost Hunt. One of the most #haunted locations in Illinois. This location was featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures and Only In Your State

This is a sleepover event.

Find out if the former residents of this former poor farm are still lingering in the dark corridors

Are you prepared to investigate one of the top three most haunted locations in Illinois? Do you have what it takes to encounter the spirits of those who may still be haunting the halls of this historic building? Join us, and see why a visit to Ashmore Estates may very well leave you feeling breathless…

Find out if the former residents of this former poor farm are still lingering in the dark corridors. Maybe you’ll face the spirits of past patients from the time when this building served as a psychiatric hospital. If you are brave enough to walk through the doors, you may find someone waiting to communicate with you.

The activity experienced on all three floors of this structure have caused some guests to flee, but other courageous souls have managed to stay through the night to recount their stories of being touched or awakened from their sleep by some unseen force.

Will you hear what some have reported as “cries of help” coming from seemingly empty rooms? Or maybe a whisper in your ear even though you think you’re alone? With over 100 reported deaths over the long history of this property, it’s no surprise that many people who stay here sense an incredible amount of residual energy remaining within these walls.

Wherever you venture throughout this location, you can be sure of one thing: you are never alone.

Location History:

Constructed as the new almshouse for the Coles County Poor Farm in 1916, the structure now known as Ashmore Estates cost just over $20,000 to build. It operated as poor house or county home until the late 1950s, serving the homeless, aged and mentally ill of the community who had no other place to go. It replaced the original almshouse which was built at the same location in 1857 but had fallen into disrepair and had become inhabitable. It was condemned in 1911 due to “vermin-infested walls,” “contaminated food,” as well as other factors.

From the time the construction of the new almshouse was completed in 1916 until February of 1959, countless people were forced to take up residence at this poor farm. And accordingly, many people died here. The county once maintained two small cemeteries nearby which hold the remains of between 60 and 100 people who were likely residents of the poor farm.

In 1959, Coles County sold the property to a corporation called Ashmore Estates, who opened and operated the building as a private psychiatric hospital. But by October of 1964, the hospital had to shut it doors due to the large amount of debt it had incurred. However, the building reopened as a facility to house state mental patients in 1965, and by 1968 there were 49 people in residence.

The property changed ownership again in July 1976 when Paul Swinford and Galen Martinie invested over $200,000 to bring the building up to code and to construct a modern addition to the original building. Construction began in 1977 but was not completed until sometime in the 1980s. Unfortunately, in 1986, all the residents had to be moved to other homes in the area because the financial losses incurred by the institution added up to more than $1.5 million. Swinford had partnered with Convalescent Management Associates so they could help manage the finances, but to no avail, as the county departments of Public Aid and Public Health would not issue the necessary licenses on a timely basis.

Up to 1990, the building sat abandoned, until once again Swinford, along with Corrections Corporation of America, attempted to resurrect it as a mental facility to treat and house teenage boys. But the zoning permit for the project was swiftly rejected. The building was once again abandoned. Soon, Ashmore Estates became notorious for rumors of being haunted, and became the subject of devastating vandalism.

Between 1998 and 2014, the property changed hands four times. Over the years, the various owners attempted to renovate and restore the building, and at one point it was used as a haunted house attraction. However, the current owners are credited with many of the safety and preservation improvements made to the building including a new roof, a kitchenette, and the installation of bathrooms. It is now being preserved for its historical significance and used for paranormal investigations.

So now that you know the long and complicated history of this intriguing place, are you ready to join us and find out which spirits may still be calling it home?

What’s Included?
Your ghost hunt at Ashmore Estates includes the following:
Group Séances
Ghost Hunting Vigils
Structured Vigils
Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters
Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils
Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca-Cola, Diet Coke and Bottled Water
Sleepover Event
Selection of snacks
... See MoreSee Less

28 People Interested  ·  4 People Going
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Thursday July 8th, 2021, 8:30PM - Friday July 9th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

106 People Interested  ·  10 People Going
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Friday July 9th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday July 10th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

1 People Interested
Madison Seminary Ghost Hunt

Madison Seminary Ghost Hunt

Friday July 9th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday July 10th, 2021, 4:00AM

Madison Seminary6769 Middle Ridge RdMadison, OH44057 Location Map

Are you ready to explore the #haunted Madison Seminary, which was also once used as an Asylum.

The structures on this property date back to the mid-1800s, and the stories within these walls are waiting to be told. Rife with history, Madison Seminary has filled several different roles over the years, and countless people called it home. Question is, how many of them still roam the halls?

And are you ready to try to make contact with them? Maybe you’ll encounter Elizabeth Stiles – a Civil War spy who worked for the Union, and find she still has something to say. Or perhaps any one of the many people who stayed here when it was a school, or a hospital for the mentally ill, or the vocational rehabilitation facility for the women’s prison?

Volunteers, visitors and paranormal investigators alike claim a wide range of activity at Madison Seminary, including knocking in response to questions, footsteps heard down empty hallways, and disembodied voices in their ears. Many people report they feel uncomfortable in certain areas and the distinct feeling of being watched. Seemingly intelligent interaction with investigation equipment is common; motion detectors going off in empty rooms, EVPs captured on recorders in response to questions, as well as equipment malfunction such as brand-new batteries being drained unexplainably.

Others say they have witnessed doors opening and closing on their own and lights turning on and off. It is not uncommon for people to assert they have been touched, their hair pulled, or their clothing tugged. More than once, visitors have maintained seeing a female apparition, or shadow figures lurking within these rooms. Often, the sound of children’s laughter can also be heard.

Madison Seminary is calling to you. Are you ready to try to communicate with the child spirits who still dwell here using the toys in “Sarah’s Room”? Spend some time in the basement and see who shows up. Stories abound on every floor of this historic institution. Come with us and see if you have what it takes to undertake a vigil in the top floor “asylum” – if you dare.

Consisting of two historic buildings – “The Ohio Cottage” and “The Civil War” building, Madison Seminary has a rich and varied history. The Civil War building consists of 23 rooms on three floors, measuring 6,120 square feet. The Ohio Cottage boasts 63 rooms comprised of 25,136 square feet.

The Ohio Cottage has served many purposes throughout its extensive history, but it was first constructed in the mid-1840s to provide a space for secondary education and housed Madison Seminary from 1847 until 1891. In 1859, the brick boarding hall was added to the east side of the building, which is now referred to as the Civil War building. Due to the rise of public education, the seminary closed its doors and the building was sold to the Ohio Women’s Relief Corps (WRC) in 1891.The structure was then renamed Madison Home. It offered assistance and a place to live for those women who were displaced by the Civil War, including mothers, wives and sisters of soldiers, as well as Army nurses. At this time, the west wing was added onto the building.

One of the building’s most famous residents was a woman named Elizabeth Stiles – a Civil War spy working for the Union. Her husband was killed in front of her by Confederate sympathizers upon learning that Elizabeth was pro-Union. She was recruited by Abraham Lincoln to spy for the North until her identity became known in 1864. In 1865, she moved to the Madison Home and she died there in 1898.

However, in 1904, the WRC was no longer able to afford the upkeep on the property and it was donated to the State of Ohio, even though a part of the building continued to be used by WRC. The new name for the facility became the Home of the Ohio Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Their Wives, Mothers, Widows and Army Nurses. The state maintained the building until 1962 as a home for military widows and veterans’ children in need. A one-story center section which connects the Ohio Cottage and the east wing was built in 1959.

When the Madison Home ran into financial difficulties in 1962, the property was acquired by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Hygiene, and the women who were residing there at the time were forced to live with relatives or sent to nursing homes.

The building was used to rehabilitate mentally ill patients from Cleveland State Hospital from 1962-1975, and it became part of Apple Creek Institution. At this time, the name of the building changed to Opportunity Village, and it was additionally used as a residence for women with milder forms of developmental disabilities. It was also briefly used as an extension to Cleveland State Hospital for elderly women suffering from dementia in 1964. In addition, inmates from the Ohio Women’s Reformatory in Marysville, Ohio who were model prisoners were allowed to live here and participate in vocational rehabilitation programs which taught them occupational skills to help them become productive members of the community. Due to funding problems, Opportunity Village was closed in April of 1975.

In 1977, Lake County purchased the property, and Madison Township leased it in 1978, using it for government offices until 1993. Part of the building was used by the local police station in the early 1990s. But from 1993 until 1998, the buildings remained vacant, perhaps because when the property was listed for rent, the ad stated: “can be leased cheap, caution – building may be haunted”. In 1998, it was sold to the owner of Cass-Mill Nurseries and it was used for storage and office space for several years. Madison Historical Society was allowed to use a portion of the building as a museum during this time.

In 2016, Adam Kimmell purchased the property and began to turn it into a virtual “time capsule” – filling the rooms with period furniture and protecting the beautiful details of the architecture. Since that time, he has worked diligently, along with the “MAD crew”, to preserve not only the buildings, but also the stories of those who lived and worked in this amazing, historic place.

Many of the volunteers and visitors will tell you that when you walk into Madison Seminary, you are walking into history – and that there is no shortage of spirits who are waiting to tell their stories and let you know you are not alone. Join us and see who you might meet within these walls. With so many souls passing through these doors over the past 170 years, there is sure to be someone waiting for you…
... See MoreSee Less

8 People Interested
Madison Seminary Ghost Hunt

Madison Seminary Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 10th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday July 11th, 2021, 4:00AM

Madison Seminary6769 Middle Ridge RdMadison, OH44057 Location Map

Are you ready to explore the #haunted Madison Seminary, which was also once used as an Asylum.

The structures on this property date back to the mid-1800s, and the stories within these walls are waiting to be told. Rife with history, Madison Seminary has filled several different roles over the years, and countless people called it home. Question is, how many of them still roam the halls?

And are you ready to try to make contact with them? Maybe you’ll encounter Elizabeth Stiles – a Civil War spy who worked for the Union, and find she still has something to say. Or perhaps any one of the many people who stayed here when it was a school, or a hospital for the mentally ill, or the vocational rehabilitation facility for the women’s prison?

Volunteers, visitors and paranormal investigators alike claim a wide range of activity at Madison Seminary, including knocking in response to questions, footsteps heard down empty hallways, and disembodied voices in their ears. Many people report they feel uncomfortable in certain areas and the distinct feeling of being watched. Seemingly intelligent interaction with investigation equipment is common; motion detectors going off in empty rooms, EVPs captured on recorders in response to questions, as well as equipment malfunction such as brand-new batteries being drained unexplainably.

Others say they have witnessed doors opening and closing on their own and lights turning on and off. It is not uncommon for people to assert they have been touched, their hair pulled, or their clothing tugged. More than once, visitors have maintained seeing a female apparition, or shadow figures lurking within these rooms. Often, the sound of children’s laughter can also be heard.

Madison Seminary is calling to you. Are you ready to try to communicate with the child spirits who still dwell here using the toys in “Sarah’s Room”? Spend some time in the basement and see who shows up. Stories abound on every floor of this historic institution. Come with us and see if you have what it takes to undertake a vigil in the top floor “asylum” – if you dare.

Consisting of two historic buildings – “The Ohio Cottage” and “The Civil War” building, Madison Seminary has a rich and varied history. The Civil War building consists of 23 rooms on three floors, measuring 6,120 square feet. The Ohio Cottage boasts 63 rooms comprised of 25,136 square feet.

The Ohio Cottage has served many purposes throughout its extensive history, but it was first constructed in the mid-1840s to provide a space for secondary education and housed Madison Seminary from 1847 until 1891. In 1859, the brick boarding hall was added to the east side of the building, which is now referred to as the Civil War building. Due to the rise of public education, the seminary closed its doors and the building was sold to the Ohio Women’s Relief Corps (WRC) in 1891.The structure was then renamed Madison Home. It offered assistance and a place to live for those women who were displaced by the Civil War, including mothers, wives and sisters of soldiers, as well as Army nurses. At this time, the west wing was added onto the building.

One of the building’s most famous residents was a woman named Elizabeth Stiles – a Civil War spy working for the Union. Her husband was killed in front of her by Confederate sympathizers upon learning that Elizabeth was pro-Union. She was recruited by Abraham Lincoln to spy for the North until her identity became known in 1864. In 1865, she moved to the Madison Home and she died there in 1898.

However, in 1904, the WRC was no longer able to afford the upkeep on the property and it was donated to the State of Ohio, even though a part of the building continued to be used by WRC. The new name for the facility became the Home of the Ohio Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Their Wives, Mothers, Widows and Army Nurses. The state maintained the building until 1962 as a home for military widows and veterans’ children in need. A one-story center section which connects the Ohio Cottage and the east wing was built in 1959.

When the Madison Home ran into financial difficulties in 1962, the property was acquired by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Hygiene, and the women who were residing there at the time were forced to live with relatives or sent to nursing homes.

The building was used to rehabilitate mentally ill patients from Cleveland State Hospital from 1962-1975, and it became part of Apple Creek Institution. At this time, the name of the building changed to Opportunity Village, and it was additionally used as a residence for women with milder forms of developmental disabilities. It was also briefly used as an extension to Cleveland State Hospital for elderly women suffering from dementia in 1964. In addition, inmates from the Ohio Women’s Reformatory in Marysville, Ohio who were model prisoners were allowed to live here and participate in vocational rehabilitation programs which taught them occupational skills to help them become productive members of the community. Due to funding problems, Opportunity Village was closed in April of 1975.

In 1977, Lake County purchased the property, and Madison Township leased it in 1978, using it for government offices until 1993. Part of the building was used by the local police station in the early 1990s. But from 1993 until 1998, the buildings remained vacant, perhaps because when the property was listed for rent, the ad stated: “can be leased cheap, caution – building may be haunted”. In 1998, it was sold to the owner of Cass-Mill Nurseries and it was used for storage and office space for several years. Madison Historical Society was allowed to use a portion of the building as a museum during this time.

In 2016, Adam Kimmell purchased the property and began to turn it into a virtual “time capsule” – filling the rooms with period furniture and protecting the beautiful details of the architecture. Since that time, he has worked diligently, along with the “MAD crew”, to preserve not only the buildings, but also the stories of those who lived and worked in this amazing, historic place.

Many of the volunteers and visitors will tell you that when you walk into Madison Seminary, you are walking into history – and that there is no shortage of spirits who are waiting to tell their stories and let you know you are not alone. Join us and see who you might meet within these walls. With so many souls passing through these doors over the past 170 years, there is sure to be someone waiting for you…
... See MoreSee Less

35 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 10th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday July 11th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

82 People Interested  ·  5 People Going
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 10th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday July 11th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

1 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Thursday July 15th, 2021, 8:30PM - Friday July 16th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

51 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

Friday July 16th, 2021, 8:00PM - Saturday July 17th, 2021, 3:00AM

Squirrel Cage Jail of Pottawattamie County, Iowa226 Pearl StCouncil Bluffs, IA51503 Location Map

The #haunted Squirrel Cage Jail has been featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures. The Squirrel Jail in Iowa is one of the most haunted jails. It was also home to the "Jake Bird" the evil serial killer who took the lives of 44 victims!

Are you ready to explore a unique piece of history and find out who may still dwell within the confines of this unusual lockup?

Constructed in 1885 and in operation as a jail until 1969, the Squirrel Cage Jail offers guests a chance to experience what life may have been like doing time (or working in) a “human-rotary” style jail. One of only three such jails of still in existence, this strange building design surely holds secrets from the past.

Your ghost hunt at Squirrel Cage Jail includes the following:

Access to the most haunted areas of this prison,
Smaller Group Sizes,
45 Minute History tour,
Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present),
Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators,
Lone Vigils,
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers,
Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water

Paranormal:

Not surprisingly, there are a number of reports of paranormal activity within the structure, some dating back to when the jail was still in operation. It is said a jailer from the 1950s named Bill Foster refused to use the fourth floor as his living quarters because of “strange goings-on up there,” which including footsteps when no one was up there and odd sensations when he went upstairs to investigate.

One former tour guide has claimed to have seen the spirit of J.M. Carter, the gentleman who supervised the building’s construction in 1885. He was reportedly the first resident of the fourth floor living quarters. Perhaps he has stuck around to keep an eye on things to this day.

Others have recounted seeing a full-bodied apparition, also on the top floor, who they believe may be another former jailer named Otto Gufath. Still another person stated she saw the ghost of what appeared to be a sad little girl dressed in gray, sitting inside a cell which was completely inaccessible at the time.

Over the years, visitors and employees alike have described a number of possible paranormal happenings, including feeling like they are being watched, having their clothes tugged on, hearing disembodied voices, doors opening and closing by themselves, seeing strange lights and hearing odd, unexplainable noises.

Spend some time with us and see if you can discover which spirits may still be lingering here, trying to communicate with the living – and what they might have to say about the conditions they endured at the Squirrel Cage Jail.

Location History:

In Council Bluffs, Iowa there stands a stately brick building erected in the late 1800s which houses a most remarkable lockup known as the Squirrel Cage Jail. One of only 18 of its kind built, this “human rotary’ jail is now only one of three still in existence, and the only one that stands three stories tall.

Constructed in 1885 under the supervision of J. M. Carter, the jail features 10 pie-shaped cells on each level, and each cell was meant to house between two – and some say up to six – prisoners at a time. This bizarre design was the brainchild of Indianapolis natives William H. Brown and Benjamin F. Haugh, and the intention was to “provide maximum security with minimum jailer attention,” – thus cutting down on the number of personnel needed to run the prison.

The jailer’s office, kitchen, trustee cells and women’s quarters were located in the front of the building on the first floor and living quarters for the jailer were on the fourth floor. The three levles of cells are placed on a central carousel or drum which was turned using a hand crank. The bars (or cage) are stationary and have only one opening on each floor. The cells were rotated using the hand crank until each one would line up with the cage opening so that prisoners could be accessed, but only one cell at a time.

Over time, the rotating carousel housing the cells became more difficult to turn and often became stuck, making it nearly impossible to get food or medical assistance to prisoners if needed. Inmates often suffered broken arms and legs when they would mistakenly (or deliberately) stick their limbs through the individual cell bars while the drum was being spun.

However, there are only four recorded deaths on the property during its more than 80-year run as a prison. One inmate died from and apparent heart attack. Another was found hanged in his cell. A third prisoner reportedly died when he fell three stories after trying to climb up the cage to carve his name in the ceiling. The fourth death was rumored to be that of an officer of the local police department who accidently shot himself during the confusion of the Farmer’s Holiday Association Strike in 1932 when 84 protesters were arrested and jailed.

The Squirrel Cage Jail was in operation until 1969, when it was deemed “unfit for human habitation.” In 1971, after the prison was shut down and its remaining prisoners moved to other facilities, it was obtained by the Council Bluffs Park Board. They were successful in getting the structure listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.The Historical Society of Pottawattamie County – who owns and operates the building today – headed the endeavor to protect the jail in 1977, and it is now a museum which offers a glimpse into the unique cultural and architectural history of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
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2 People Interested
Wilson Castle Ghost Hunt

Wilson Castle Ghost Hunt

Friday July 16th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday July 17th, 2021, 4:00AM

Wilson CastleProctor, VT Location Map

As you navigate the long drive you are instantly taken back to the year 1885.

You won’t see men in top hats, nor women in long gowns, but you will see why this Castle is a purely incredible sight to behold and is one of the most visited historic locations in Vermont.

You will also understand why the year 1885 still lives on.

The stunning turrets, stained glassed windows, and massive wooden doors are the things that fairytales are made of. This however, is not the wonderland you were expecting!

Harrowing paranormal experiences can quickly turn fairytales into nightmares.

Wilson Castle being one of the most expensive homes ever build in Vermont, captivates all with its ever so impressive details. One-of-a-kind fireplace, wood fixtures, and imported fixtures from around the world are imbedded in every inch of this exquisite castle.

Now, pull up a chair and let us tell you how this became known as Wilson Castle.

In 1885, Doctor John Johnson with wife, Sarah, decided it was time to build a house as beautiful as their family! He had strict ideas and instructions on how this home must be designed.

We are still unsure where his wonderous vision came from! Some believe it’s his English born aristocrat wife, who spent many years visiting English castles, while others think he just wanted the best!

Doctor Johnson did not peddle around the idea, but instead went full speed ahead. He started ordering bricks from Europe, foreign Laborers, and materials from around the world!

The goal was to build a 32-room castle which would include a music room, gallery, two dining rooms, grand parlor, hidden ballroom on the third floor, and many bedrooms for his lavished guests.

The castle was built from their dreams, which would soon be crushed. Sarah’s family decided to stop providing financial help, which caused many issues.

Devastated Doctor Johnson fled his home, leaving Sarah and his son behind. This in turn, forced, Sarah to sell the castle of her dreams. Sarah ended up moving to Boston, and never heard from or saw John again.

Passing from owner to owner, the castle finally ended up in Colonel Wilsons possession in 1940. Colonel Wilson created the name Wilson Castle, which it is known as today.

After his death, his granddaughter wanted to share this historic building with the world and created Wilson Castle Museum.

Paranormal:

Our Ghost Hunts at Wilson Castle in Proctor, Vermont satisfy the intriguing lore of one of the most haunted locations in Vermont.

When we talk about haunted locations, Wilson Castle is on the list of places you have to visit!

Wilson Castle’s well-known hauntings bring paranormal investigators searching for the other side, and when the lights go out this castle opens its veil to the other side.

The embedded residual energy seems to be in every room, and wherever you venture off to, you are constantly followed by the unseen residents of the castle.

A woman’s voice, cries and groans have been heard coming from upstairs, and many ghost hunters have seen the reflection of a woman wearing a black mourning dress in the mirror from Sarah’s former room.

Items move on their own, apparitions have been sighted, disembodied voices coming from empty rooms, doors closing, cold spots, and much more.

This is just a fraction of what has been witnessed and reported at this amazing location.

The spirits that still roam this haunted castle truly do let their presence be known.

Are you ready to explore the haunted Wilson Castle?

What's Included?


Your ghost hunt at Wilson Castle includes the following:

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

12 People Interested
Fairfield County Infirmary Ghost Hunt

Fairfield County Infirmary Ghost Hunt

Friday July 16th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday July 17th, 2021, 4:00AM

Fairfield County Infirmary1587 Granville Pike, Lancaster, OH 43130-1038, United StatesLancaster, OH43130-1038 Location Map

The haunted Fairfield County Infirmary is a haven for the paranormal. Our overnight Ghost Hunt at this location will definitely test your nerve.

The Fairfield Infirmary harbors some dark secrets, and once you venture off into the former morgue, you’ll soon understand why this location has the haunted reputation that it does.

The embedded residual energy still lingers in these very walls!

The Paranormal:

With a long history consisting of over 170 years of serving the less fortunate in the community, this formidable brick building may hold more than history in its walls.

Some argue that the spirits of residents past still roam the halls. From a ghost named “Willy” who is said to haunt the second and third floors, to an entity of a little girl named “Susie” who may be lonely and looking for a playmate only to vanish into thin air, former employees claim this building is full of paranormal activity.

Visitors have reported hearing disembodied voices and slamming doors, smelling lavender perfume, and witnessing objects move seemingly on their own.

Perhaps the spirit of Jane Householder, an elderly woman who was burned to death when her clothing caught on fire from a gas stove, will make herself known and want to share her story with you.

Or maybe the former superintendent accused of abusing the residents who worked the fields is still hanging around – believing he is still in charge.

Prior investigations of this facility have proven to be active and hair-raising with reports of uncomfortable and uneasy feelings in the basement, slamming of the cell door on the third floor, a 7-foot dark shadow figure dwelling in the attic, and EVPs have been captured throughout the property.

Equipment failure or malfunction and unexplained banging often occurs, rattling even the most experienced ghost hunter.

Join us for a night of exploration and investigation of the Fairfield County Infirmary – as well as the cemetery full of unmarked graves situated behind the building. Do you dare? Are you ready to engage in a lone vigil in the basement where the makeshift morgue held bodies of those who died during the winters? Or in the jail-like area used to contain “problem” residents with the barred door closing you in? What about Room 322 – notorious for its reports of sightings of apparitions and physical interactions between entities and the living who have the courage to visit? There’s only one way to find out if you have what it takes…


Location History:

The property on which the current imposing brick structure consisting of 35,000 feet sits served the Fairfield County community for over 170 years.

In 1828, township officers charged with overseeing the poor and unfortunate contracted the construction of a wooden building just north of Lancaster, Ohio. It was soon filled to capacity, acting as a place where the destitute, mentally ill, physically disabled, elderly, and orphaned could receive food, clothing, shelter and medical care.

By 1840, the originally wood structure was replaced by a large brick building. Additions were made to the facility in 1865, both to the main building as well as constructing a number of outbuildings used for storage, tenants, laundry and farming. The working farm was located across the street and many residents worked the land to provide food for themselves and others housed at the infirmary.

In 1917, natural gas lines were run to the building to provide heat and lighting. Water pipes were laid in 1926, but electricity was not installed until 1958. A cemetery which stands behind the building is where paupers and residents without family to claim their bodies lie – and many of the graves are unmarked.

According to records, the number of individuals residing at the poorhouse in 1903 was 82, and they were “admitted” for several different reasons, including mental and physical health conditions that could not be managed by family members. There were many residents who spent most of their lives at the infirmary and who died there as well.

While some died from old age or their medical conditions, a few met their fate a bit more suddenly and tragically. One such story involves Jane Householder, a 73-year-old resident whose clothing caught on fire when she opened a gas stove. While attendants working at the infirmary were able to smother the fire, Ms. Householder survived her burns for only a few hours.

Stories persist that a former superintendent was particularly cruel to the residents of the poorhouse, reportedly beating them as they worked in the fields of the farm.

These punishments were witnessed by others in the community and reported, according to an article published in 1851 in the Lancaster Gazette.

The good Samaritans of the area effectively brought an end to the superintendent’s brutality, and the life of those residing at the poorhouse improved once the abuse ceased.

In fact, it is said that county officials would occasionally visit and enjoy a meal with residents of the infirmary.

Members of the community would donate Christmas gifts, local musicians would play for the elderly, and ice cream socials were held – all to help improve the lives of those housed there.

Still, stories of suicide and violence persist, as life at the poorhouse was difficult – too many people with a variety of problems all living under one roof often proves to be disastrous.

The infirmary remained in operation until May 1985, when the final sixteen residents were moved to local nursing facilities or foster homes.

The facility was remodeled in 1986 and the county offices were moved there after safety measures were taken, including the installation of fire alarms, sprinklers and emergency lighting.

It was then renamed the Clarence E. Miller Building after the former congressman, and the county health department continued to operate in the building until 2013, even though the structure was in complete disrepair by 2011.

The building remains vacant today, welcoming only those brave enough to step through the doors and see if there may, in fact, still be some former residents still lingering there…

Your ghost hunt at Fairfield County Infirmary includes the following:

Exclusive Overnight Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

16 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Friday July 16th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday July 17th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”
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12 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 17th, 2021, 8:00PM - Sunday July 18th, 2021, 3:00AM

Squirrel Cage Jail of Pottawattamie County, Iowa226 Pearl StCouncil Bluffs, IA51503 Location Map

The #haunted Squirrel Cage Jail has been featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures. The Squirrel Jail in Iowa is one of the most haunted jails. It was also home to the "Jake Bird" the evil serial killer who took the lives of 44 victims!

Are you ready to explore a unique piece of history and find out who may still dwell within the confines of this unusual lockup?

Constructed in 1885 and in operation as a jail until 1969, the Squirrel Cage Jail offers guests a chance to experience what life may have been like doing time (or working in) a “human-rotary” style jail. One of only three such jails of still in existence, this strange building design surely holds secrets from the past.

Your ghost hunt at Squirrel Cage Jail includes the following:

Access to the most haunted areas of this prison,
Smaller Group Sizes,
45 Minute History tour,
Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present),
Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators,
Lone Vigils,
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers,
Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water

Paranormal:

Not surprisingly, there are a number of reports of paranormal activity within the structure, some dating back to when the jail was still in operation. It is said a jailer from the 1950s named Bill Foster refused to use the fourth floor as his living quarters because of “strange goings-on up there,” which including footsteps when no one was up there and odd sensations when he went upstairs to investigate.

One former tour guide has claimed to have seen the spirit of J.M. Carter, the gentleman who supervised the building’s construction in 1885. He was reportedly the first resident of the fourth floor living quarters. Perhaps he has stuck around to keep an eye on things to this day.

Others have recounted seeing a full-bodied apparition, also on the top floor, who they believe may be another former jailer named Otto Gufath. Still another person stated she saw the ghost of what appeared to be a sad little girl dressed in gray, sitting inside a cell which was completely inaccessible at the time.

Over the years, visitors and employees alike have described a number of possible paranormal happenings, including feeling like they are being watched, having their clothes tugged on, hearing disembodied voices, doors opening and closing by themselves, seeing strange lights and hearing odd, unexplainable noises.

Spend some time with us and see if you can discover which spirits may still be lingering here, trying to communicate with the living – and what they might have to say about the conditions they endured at the Squirrel Cage Jail.

Location History:

In Council Bluffs, Iowa there stands a stately brick building erected in the late 1800s which houses a most remarkable lockup known as the Squirrel Cage Jail. One of only 18 of its kind built, this “human rotary’ jail is now only one of three still in existence, and the only one that stands three stories tall.

Constructed in 1885 under the supervision of J. M. Carter, the jail features 10 pie-shaped cells on each level, and each cell was meant to house between two – and some say up to six – prisoners at a time. This bizarre design was the brainchild of Indianapolis natives William H. Brown and Benjamin F. Haugh, and the intention was to “provide maximum security with minimum jailer attention,” – thus cutting down on the number of personnel needed to run the prison.

The jailer’s office, kitchen, trustee cells and women’s quarters were located in the front of the building on the first floor and living quarters for the jailer were on the fourth floor. The three levles of cells are placed on a central carousel or drum which was turned using a hand crank. The bars (or cage) are stationary and have only one opening on each floor. The cells were rotated using the hand crank until each one would line up with the cage opening so that prisoners could be accessed, but only one cell at a time.

Over time, the rotating carousel housing the cells became more difficult to turn and often became stuck, making it nearly impossible to get food or medical assistance to prisoners if needed. Inmates often suffered broken arms and legs when they would mistakenly (or deliberately) stick their limbs through the individual cell bars while the drum was being spun.

However, there are only four recorded deaths on the property during its more than 80-year run as a prison. One inmate died from and apparent heart attack. Another was found hanged in his cell. A third prisoner reportedly died when he fell three stories after trying to climb up the cage to carve his name in the ceiling. The fourth death was rumored to be that of an officer of the local police department who accidently shot himself during the confusion of the Farmer’s Holiday Association Strike in 1932 when 84 protesters were arrested and jailed.

The Squirrel Cage Jail was in operation until 1969, when it was deemed “unfit for human habitation.” In 1971, after the prison was shut down and its remaining prisoners moved to other facilities, it was obtained by the Council Bluffs Park Board. They were successful in getting the structure listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.The Historical Society of Pottawattamie County – who owns and operates the building today – headed the endeavor to protect the jail in 1977, and it is now a museum which offers a glimpse into the unique cultural and architectural history of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
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1 People Interested
Fairfield County Infirmary Ghost Hunt

Fairfield County Infirmary Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 17th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday July 18th, 2021, 4:00AM

Fairfield County Infirmary1587 Granville Pike, Lancaster, OH 43130-1038, United StatesLancaster, OH43130-1038 Location Map

The haunted Fairfield County Infirmary is a haven for the paranormal. Our overnight Ghost Hunt at this location will definitely test your nerve.

The Fairfield Infirmary harbors some dark secrets, and once you venture off into the former morgue, you’ll soon understand why this location has the haunted reputation that it does.

The embedded residual energy still lingers in these very walls!

The Paranormal:

With a long history consisting of over 170 years of serving the less fortunate in the community, this formidable brick building may hold more than history in its walls.

Some argue that the spirits of residents past still roam the halls. From a ghost named “Willy” who is said to haunt the second and third floors, to an entity of a little girl named “Susie” who may be lonely and looking for a playmate only to vanish into thin air, former employees claim this building is full of paranormal activity.

Visitors have reported hearing disembodied voices and slamming doors, smelling lavender perfume, and witnessing objects move seemingly on their own.

Perhaps the spirit of Jane Householder, an elderly woman who was burned to death when her clothing caught on fire from a gas stove, will make herself known and want to share her story with you.

Or maybe the former superintendent accused of abusing the residents who worked the fields is still hanging around – believing he is still in charge.

Prior investigations of this facility have proven to be active and hair-raising with reports of uncomfortable and uneasy feelings in the basement, slamming of the cell door on the third floor, a 7-foot dark shadow figure dwelling in the attic, and EVPs have been captured throughout the property.

Equipment failure or malfunction and unexplained banging often occurs, rattling even the most experienced ghost hunter.

Join us for a night of exploration and investigation of the Fairfield County Infirmary – as well as the cemetery full of unmarked graves situated behind the building. Do you dare? Are you ready to engage in a lone vigil in the basement where the makeshift morgue held bodies of those who died during the winters? Or in the jail-like area used to contain “problem” residents with the barred door closing you in? What about Room 322 – notorious for its reports of sightings of apparitions and physical interactions between entities and the living who have the courage to visit? There’s only one way to find out if you have what it takes…


Location History:

The property on which the current imposing brick structure consisting of 35,000 feet sits served the Fairfield County community for over 170 years.

In 1828, township officers charged with overseeing the poor and unfortunate contracted the construction of a wooden building just north of Lancaster, Ohio. It was soon filled to capacity, acting as a place where the destitute, mentally ill, physically disabled, elderly, and orphaned could receive food, clothing, shelter and medical care.

By 1840, the originally wood structure was replaced by a large brick building. Additions were made to the facility in 1865, both to the main building as well as constructing a number of outbuildings used for storage, tenants, laundry and farming. The working farm was located across the street and many residents worked the land to provide food for themselves and others housed at the infirmary.

In 1917, natural gas lines were run to the building to provide heat and lighting. Water pipes were laid in 1926, but electricity was not installed until 1958. A cemetery which stands behind the building is where paupers and residents without family to claim their bodies lie – and many of the graves are unmarked.

According to records, the number of individuals residing at the poorhouse in 1903 was 82, and they were “admitted” for several different reasons, including mental and physical health conditions that could not be managed by family members. There were many residents who spent most of their lives at the infirmary and who died there as well.

While some died from old age or their medical conditions, a few met their fate a bit more suddenly and tragically. One such story involves Jane Householder, a 73-year-old resident whose clothing caught on fire when she opened a gas stove. While attendants working at the infirmary were able to smother the fire, Ms. Householder survived her burns for only a few hours.

Stories persist that a former superintendent was particularly cruel to the residents of the poorhouse, reportedly beating them as they worked in the fields of the farm.

These punishments were witnessed by others in the community and reported, according to an article published in 1851 in the Lancaster Gazette.

The good Samaritans of the area effectively brought an end to the superintendent’s brutality, and the life of those residing at the poorhouse improved once the abuse ceased.

In fact, it is said that county officials would occasionally visit and enjoy a meal with residents of the infirmary.

Members of the community would donate Christmas gifts, local musicians would play for the elderly, and ice cream socials were held – all to help improve the lives of those housed there.

Still, stories of suicide and violence persist, as life at the poorhouse was difficult – too many people with a variety of problems all living under one roof often proves to be disastrous.

The infirmary remained in operation until May 1985, when the final sixteen residents were moved to local nursing facilities or foster homes.

The facility was remodeled in 1986 and the county offices were moved there after safety measures were taken, including the installation of fire alarms, sprinklers and emergency lighting.

It was then renamed the Clarence E. Miller Building after the former congressman, and the county health department continued to operate in the building until 2013, even though the structure was in complete disrepair by 2011.

The building remains vacant today, welcoming only those brave enough to step through the doors and see if there may, in fact, still be some former residents still lingering there…

Your ghost hunt at Fairfield County Infirmary includes the following:

Exclusive Overnight Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
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6 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Wilson Castle Ghost Hunt

Wilson Castle Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 17th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday July 18th, 2021, 4:00AM

Wilson CastleProctor, VT Location Map

As you navigate the long drive you are instantly taken back to the year 1885.

You won’t see men in top hats, nor women in long gowns, but you will see why this Castle is a purely incredible sight to behold and is one of the most visited historic locations in Vermont.

You will also understand why the year 1885 still lives on.

The stunning turrets, stained glassed windows, and massive wooden doors are the things that fairytales are made of. This however, is not the wonderland you were expecting!

Harrowing paranormal experiences can quickly turn fairytales into nightmares.

Wilson Castle being one of the most expensive homes ever build in Vermont, captivates all with its ever so impressive details. One-of-a-kind fireplace, wood fixtures, and imported fixtures from around the world are imbedded in every inch of this exquisite castle.

Now, pull up a chair and let us tell you how this became known as Wilson Castle.

In 1885, Doctor John Johnson with wife, Sarah, decided it was time to build a house as beautiful as their family! He had strict ideas and instructions on how this home must be designed.

We are still unsure where his wonderous vision came from! Some believe it’s his English born aristocrat wife, who spent many years visiting English castles, while others think he just wanted the best!

Doctor Johnson did not peddle around the idea, but instead went full speed ahead. He started ordering bricks from Europe, foreign Laborers, and materials from around the world!

The goal was to build a 32-room castle which would include a music room, gallery, two dining rooms, grand parlor, hidden ballroom on the third floor, and many bedrooms for his lavished guests.

The castle was built from their dreams, which would soon be crushed. Sarah’s family decided to stop providing financial help, which caused many issues.

Devastated Doctor Johnson fled his home, leaving Sarah and his son behind. This in turn, forced, Sarah to sell the castle of her dreams. Sarah ended up moving to Boston, and never heard from or saw John again.

Passing from owner to owner, the castle finally ended up in Colonel Wilsons possession in 1940. Colonel Wilson created the name Wilson Castle, which it is known as today.

After his death, his granddaughter wanted to share this historic building with the world and created Wilson Castle Museum.

Paranormal:

Our Ghost Hunts at Wilson Castle in Proctor, Vermont satisfy the intriguing lore of one of the most haunted locations in Vermont.

When we talk about haunted locations, Wilson Castle is on the list of places you have to visit!

Wilson Castle’s well-known hauntings bring paranormal investigators searching for the other side, and when the lights go out this castle opens its veil to the other side.

The embedded residual energy seems to be in every room, and wherever you venture off to, you are constantly followed by the unseen residents of the castle.

A woman’s voice, cries and groans have been heard coming from upstairs, and many ghost hunters have seen the reflection of a woman wearing a black mourning dress in the mirror from Sarah’s former room.

Items move on their own, apparitions have been sighted, disembodied voices coming from empty rooms, doors closing, cold spots, and much more.

This is just a fraction of what has been witnessed and reported at this amazing location.

The spirits that still roam this haunted castle truly do let their presence be known.

Are you ready to explore the haunted Wilson Castle?

What's Included?


Your ghost hunt at Wilson Castle includes the following:

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
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44 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 17th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday July 18th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

45 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Gettysburg Ghost Hunt & Psychic Development Workshop

Gettysburg Ghost Hunt & Psychic Development Workshop

Friday July 23rd, 2021, 3:00PM - Saturday July 24th, 2021, 10:00AM

Baladerry Inn40 Hospital RoadGettysburg, PA17325 Location Map

The Baladerry Inn is one of the most haunted locations in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania We have exclusive private access to this very haunted location, which used to be a field hospital.

This is an exclusive psychic medium event and includes the following:

Paranormal Intuitive Development Workshop (Worth over $200 per person INCLUDED)
Overnight Accommodation,
Psychic Séance to contact loved ones that have passed,
2 Psychic Mediums,
Exclusive Ghost Hunt and History Tour at our secret location which is alongside the battlefield,
3 Course Dinner with complimentary wine,
Ghost Hunting Vigils with exclusive access to the Battlefield and the Field Hospital Room,
Complimentary Soda, Coffee and Snacks during Ghost Hunt,
Hot Breakfast,
All Room Taxes and Meal Gratuity Included

Pennsylvania #haunted Ghost hunting BuzzFeed

The Baladerry Inn was built as a farmhouse in 1812 on the outskirts of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania as part of the George Bushman farm. The picturesque countryside was an ideal location for agricultural growth but soon it would come to know the taste of blood. Ghost Adventures Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania

The fateful battle that would become a strong determining factor of the Civil War took place in the small town and fields of Gettysburg from July 1st-July 3rd of 1863. General Robert E. Lee had crushed the Union forces at Chancellorsville and began to advance his Army of Northern Virginia into Pennsylvania in the latter part of June of the same year. There he would clash with the Union Army of the Potomac led by General George G. Meade.

The bulk of both the Confederate and Union forces engaged in battle at the crossroads town of Gettysburg. The three days of fighting left heavy casualties on both sides. The Union Army lost 23,000 men while the Confederates lost upwards of 28,000. With the loss at Gettysburg, the Confederates lost the hope of foreign recognition of their cause and led General Lee to offer his resignation to President Jefferson Davis. The offer was declined but after the Battle of Gettysburg and the Battle of Vicksburg, the Civil War was turned in the Union favor.

During these days of battle, the Baladerry Inn, like many other homes around the battlefields, served as a field hospital for wounded soldiers and civilians alike. The main hall was used to treat the soldiers where several amputations took place. You can imagine that with the lack of anesthesia and very little attention given to sterility, many soldiers met their demise. There was nothing but whiskey to dull the pain and infection ran rampant amongst them.

Today, there is still a blood stain forever etched into the hardwood planks of the Baladerry Inn. Forensic methods using luminol and UV lighting has revealed the marks left by the Civil War soldiers so many years ago.

Today the Baladerry Inn serves as bed and breakfast with 10 rooms between the main house and the carriage house. Many of the original architectural structures are still standing such as the brick fireplace that is the central figure in the spacious Great Room. Although it is a relaxing retreat from the hustle and bustle of the world, you should know that you rarely sleep alone.

There are many spirits that still linger around the Baladerry Inn. Those most often seen are the Confederate Soldiers that died in and around the property. Perhaps you will have the great fortune of meeting one of the Southern Gentlemen and hearing the tales of when cotton was high and the hopes of a nation died on a battlefield in a northern crossroads town.
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21 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
Murdock Whitney Mansion Ghost Hunt

Murdock Whitney Mansion Ghost Hunt

Friday July 23rd, 2021, 8:00PM - Saturday July 24th, 2021, 3:00AM

Winchendon History and Cultural Center151 Front StWinchendon, MA01475 Location Map

Your ghost hunt at Murdock Whitney & Isaac Morse House includes the following:

Exclusive access to the most haunted areas of both of these homes.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.

Paranormal:

The Murdock-Whitney House and the Isaac Morse House have lured in paranormal investigators from all corners of the globe. You can take their word for it, or you can investigate yourself!

The Murdock-Whitney House was built in 1850 and the Isaac Morse House was built in 1775. With centuries of history, you can imagine the lasting impressions that the living and the dead have made upon these homes.

It is said that a woman roams the corridors of the Murdock-Whitney House, watching closely over those that have come into her home. She is very protective of all the things in the house and becomes extremely agitated when people enter her bedroom.
You can hear her disembodied footsteps throughout the house and it is not uncommon to hear her pacing back and forth on the third floor—a place that the staff even refuses to visit alone!

At the Isaac Morse House you are likely to encounter children laughing and playing. This is no surprise since the first owner of the home, Mr. Morse, fathered 15 children within the walls!

Lights turning on and off of their own volition, disembodied voices, creepy EVPs (electronic voice phenomena), shadow figures lurking in the darkness, footsteps, doors opening and closing, objects moving, piano music playing in the middle of the night, full-bodied apparitions of an elderly woman and young children—these two beautiful historic homes hold a plethora of evidence just waiting to be documented by you!

The only question that remains—will you be brave enough to undergo a lone vigil on the third floor?!?!

History:

Two of the most historic and haunted locations in New England stand side-by-side in Wichendon, Massachusetts.

The quiet beauty of the Murdock-Whitney House and the Isaac Morse House speaks of days long past—except for the spirits that still reside within their walls!

Elisha Murdock, founder of E. Murdock Company, built the family home in 1850 for his wife, Rohanna and their three children: Ellen, Sophia and George.

The youngest of the family, and only son, met a young demise at the age of seven.

When Sophia inherited the property circa 1900, she made many additions to the original home blending classical and Victorian styles.

It was a warm and inviting home decorated and constructed in fine elegance. The spacious renovations allowed plenty of room for the lengthy visits of extended family as well as for entertaining friends. Sophia was known for her recitals where she would play her Chickering Concert Grand Piano.

Although the fine instrument has long since been donated to a local church, it is rumored that sometimes you can still hear the eerie tones of someone playing echoing throughout the home in the twilight hours of the morning.

For five generations the beautiful house was a home for the Murdock-Whitney family until December of 2000 when upon the owner’s death it was bequeathed to the Winchendon Historical Society.

With such a rich history, it is easy to understand why the family still watches over the property making certain that all who visit are entertained.

Right next door you will find the Isaac Morse House that was first built in 1790 by Robert Ruggles.

Isaac Morse, born in 1775, was the father of 15 children. His first wife, Miriam, bore ten children and his second wife, Frances gave birth to five.

Morse was a very influential man in Winchendon up until his death in 1860.

In 1939, the home was bought by Dr. Alton Skelton. It remained in their family until his second wife, Evangline, sold the house to the Porters in 2007. Today it belongs to the Winchendon Historical Society and serves as the Gift Shop. On the property there are several antiques and artworks that lend to the haunted credibility of the house. Steeped in history, you will not want to miss the opportunity to explore its depths and seek out the spirits that are waiting to tell you their stories!
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9 People Interested
Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Friday July 23rd, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday July 24th, 2021, 4:00AM

314 NW 4th St, Mineral Wells, TX 76067-4939, United States Location Map

The #haunted Nazareth Sanatorium, in #MineralWells #Texas, is a haven for the paranormal!

Our #Ghost Hunting events at The Nazareth Hospital and former Sanatorium will push your ghost hunting nerves to new limits.

We have exclusive access to this haunted location, including access to the 5th floor.

Just make sure you don’t leave before 2am, as the witching hour is waiting for you!

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Event Start Time: 8:30pm

Event Finish Time: 4:00am

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Your ghost hunt at Nazareth Sanatorium includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

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The sun is shining, and the year is 1931.

The residents of Mineral Wells had no idea the Holy Sisters of Nazareth were making their way to this “Crazy” Haunted town to take up a life that would make a name for this small town in Texas.

With Minerals Wells already known for their “Crazy Water”, yes you read that right, this historic town has something so special in the water that hundreds of thousands of visitor’s flock here yearly.

And before you think that the “crazy water” is a myth, you simply have no idea…when you visit, and you will, make sure you take some home with you and find out why it is so special.

Let’s go back to 1931.

With the sisters climbing 7 floors, 14 flights and 126 steps, they settled into the top of this 46-room hospital, with an entourage of doctors and janitor.

Who knew that many of them would spend their final days in the Nazareth Hospital caring for the sick and those in need.

Many of them were unaware of what was about to unfold over the forthcoming years, and how much they would be needed.

The Nazareth Hospital would become a beacon of hope in Mineral Wells and no one could have predicted the events that would embed into these walls and remain unexplained.

Welcome to the Nazareth Hospital, sorry we meant, the Haunted Nazareth, and former Sanatorium Hospital.

The Holy Sisters bought the building for about $135,000 which would equate to more than $2 million today. The sisters were unaware that the land was used as a Bordello, and on that subject we will leave that part right here….

It housed its own crematorium which still sits on the site today, which was last used around the 1940’s – 1950’s.

You will soon understand that love and care was a fundamental part of the hospital.

In the 1960’s the hospital added on the name “sanatorium”.

This mighty building was a beacon of hope, protection and love, and it even survived two major fires!

Every inch of this hospital had a purpose, and every floor was used to its full potential.

The 1st floor housed Tuberculosis, Polio and Psychiatric Patients.

The 2nd floor was originally designated for administrative purposes.

The 3rd floor was used as the Chapel and patient rooms.

The 4th floor was the labor and delivery room.

The 5th floor was the surgical units.

The 6th floor Nun’s quarters

The 7th floor was occupied by the Priest, until he was relocated to the property behind the crematorium.

It is no wonder why the Nazareth Hospital has a haunted reputation, those very unique people who worked here still haunt this building, and those unfortunate souls who lost their lives still wander the very empty corridors.

Do you have what it takes to walk in the shadows of those departed?
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2 People Interested
Abbey Monastery Ghost Hunt

Abbey Monastery Ghost Hunt

Friday July 23rd, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday July 24th, 2021, 5:00AM

The Abbey CC2951 E US Highway 50Canon City, CO81212 Location Map

This former Monastery in Colorado has a #haunted reputation like no other, and the the Paranormal Activity that has been captured and witnessed here is breathtaking!

Just how brave will you be?

Walk through the maze of dark corridors and feel the residual energy still lingering in this historic monastery. Investigate with us to uncover the secrets within these hallowed walls and try to communicate with persistent spirits who may still call The Abbey home.

Will we capture intelligent responses on EVPs, or will you feel as if you’re being followed, as previous guests have? Will you see apparitions of former monks wandering the halls? Or hear chanting emanating from the many chapels and echoing through the halls of The Abbey?

If you’re brave enough to explore the vast basement area, you may soon understand why some visitors have fled. A secret tunnel in the basement connecting the monastery to Ullathorne Hall was used to cross between buildings undetected… and it is one of the areas which has reports of a very dark and heavy presence.

The Abbey truly is haunted, which just leaves one question…Are you ready to undertake a lone vigil in the Gun Room?

In Canon City, CO, on over 200 acres of land, there stands an impressive, historic monastery now known as The Abbey – an event complex and winery that hosts events nearly every weekend. With Gothic towers, graceful arches and gorgeous stained-glass windows, it is a sight to behold. But perhaps there is much more to The Abbey than what guests normally see at a wedding, car show or class reunion.

Construction of the Abbey began in 1924, after Benedictine monks who traveled from Pennsylvania made their way to Breckenridge, Colorado for missionary work in 1886. Monks from other locales followed, and they eventually settled in Canon City in the early 1920s. Through the help of an intermediary, the 90 acres of land once known as Fruitmere Orchards was purchased for the Roman Catholic Church. At the time of the sale, the owner did not want to sell because the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan did not approve of such a transaction as they were opposed Catholics as well as any and all immigrants; which is why Simon Peter Smith, who along with seven priests and monks posing as his sons, made the purchase on behalf of the church.

Originally named Holy Cross, the Abbey was completed in 1925 and ended up costing three times the original estimate, for a total of $600,000.00, which was absorbed by other Benedictine Abbeys across the United States. The first abbot, Father Cyprian Bradley, was responsible for the creation of the boys’ school, but due to the Depression, the monastery encountered financial distress and Abbott Cyprian retired in 1933. Father Leonard Schwinn became the administrator and was able to overcome the Abbey’s financial woes. He was made abbot in 1937 and remained so for more than 26 years. Eventually the town grew up around the monastery and over time, many additions were made to the original Gothic Revival structure and other buildings were added to the campus, including a gymnasium, residence halls, classroom buildings, a field house and a dining hall.

There were three separate functions of the Abbey that were carried out by the monks: a boys’ school, Holy Cross College and Seminary, and Camp Holy Cross for boys aged 8 to 14. The boys’ preparatory high school was in operation from 1926 until 1985, beginning with just 35 students. By 1928, the monastery was housing 150 enrollees. Boys and young men from the area, and from all over the world, came to the Abbey School, and by 1972 there were about 250 students in attendance. However, in 1985, declining enrollment forced the closure of the school. The monastery remained open with approximately 20 elderly monks until it, too, closed in 2005 and the complex was sold in 2007.

Today, every Halloween, the Boy Scouts hold a haunted house in the basement of the Abbey, providing thrills and chills to those who like that kind of thing. But considering the complex history of the building of the monastery and the development of the schools, perhaps there are real ghosts who reside here, still taking care of the place they called home. In the decaying, shadow-filled halls of the monks’ living quarters, perhaps the some of the guardians can still be seen and heard? Come explore and experience this grand building and investigate with us where others have never been permitted and see what secrets we can uncover…
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23 People Interested
Gettysburg Ghost Hunt & Psychic Development Workshop

Gettysburg Ghost Hunt & Psychic Development Workshop

Saturday July 24th, 2021, 3:00PM - Sunday July 25th, 2021, 10:00AM

Baladerry Inn40 Hospital RoadGettysburg, PA17325 Location Map

The Baladerry Inn is one of the most haunted locations in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania We have exclusive private access to this very haunted location, which used to be a field hospital.

This is an exclusive psychic medium event and includes the following:

Paranormal Intuitive Development Workshop (Worth over $200 per person INCLUDED)
Overnight Accommodation,
Psychic Séance to contact loved ones that have passed,
2 Psychic Mediums,
Exclusive Ghost Hunt and History Tour at our secret location which is alongside the battlefield,
3 Course Dinner with complimentary wine,
Ghost Hunting Vigils with exclusive access to the Battlefield and the Field Hospital Room,
Complimentary Soda, Coffee and Snacks during Ghost Hunt,
Hot Breakfast,
All Room Taxes and Meal Gratuity Included

Pennsylvania #haunted Ghost hunting BuzzFeed

The Baladerry Inn was built as a farmhouse in 1812 on the outskirts of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania as part of the George Bushman farm. The picturesque countryside was an ideal location for agricultural growth but soon it would come to know the taste of blood. Ghost Adventures Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania

The fateful battle that would become a strong determining factor of the Civil War took place in the small town and fields of Gettysburg from July 1st-July 3rd of 1863. General Robert E. Lee had crushed the Union forces at Chancellorsville and began to advance his Army of Northern Virginia into Pennsylvania in the latter part of June of the same year. There he would clash with the Union Army of the Potomac led by General George G. Meade.

The bulk of both the Confederate and Union forces engaged in battle at the crossroads town of Gettysburg. The three days of fighting left heavy casualties on both sides. The Union Army lost 23,000 men while the Confederates lost upwards of 28,000. With the loss at Gettysburg, the Confederates lost the hope of foreign recognition of their cause and led General Lee to offer his resignation to President Jefferson Davis. The offer was declined but after the Battle of Gettysburg and the Battle of Vicksburg, the Civil War was turned in the Union favor.

During these days of battle, the Baladerry Inn, like many other homes around the battlefields, served as a field hospital for wounded soldiers and civilians alike. The main hall was used to treat the soldiers where several amputations took place. You can imagine that with the lack of anesthesia and very little attention given to sterility, many soldiers met their demise. There was nothing but whiskey to dull the pain and infection ran rampant amongst them.

Today, there is still a blood stain forever etched into the hardwood planks of the Baladerry Inn. Forensic methods using luminol and UV lighting has revealed the marks left by the Civil War soldiers so many years ago.

Today the Baladerry Inn serves as bed and breakfast with 10 rooms between the main house and the carriage house. Many of the original architectural structures are still standing such as the brick fireplace that is the central figure in the spacious Great Room. Although it is a relaxing retreat from the hustle and bustle of the world, you should know that you rarely sleep alone.

There are many spirits that still linger around the Baladerry Inn. Those most often seen are the Confederate Soldiers that died in and around the property. Perhaps you will have the great fortune of meeting one of the Southern Gentlemen and hearing the tales of when cotton was high and the hopes of a nation died on a battlefield in a northern crossroads town.
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28 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
Murdock Whitney Mansion Ghost Hunt

Murdock Whitney Mansion Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 24th, 2021, 8:00PM - Sunday July 25th, 2021, 3:00AM

Winchendon History and Cultural Center151 Front StWinchendon, MA01475 Location Map

Your ghost hunt at Murdock Whitney & Isaac Morse House includes the following:

Exclusive access to the most haunted areas of both of these homes.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.

Paranormal:

The Murdock-Whitney House and the Isaac Morse House have lured in paranormal investigators from all corners of the globe. You can take their word for it, or you can investigate yourself!

The Murdock-Whitney House was built in 1850 and the Isaac Morse House was built in 1775. With centuries of history, you can imagine the lasting impressions that the living and the dead have made upon these homes.

It is said that a woman roams the corridors of the Murdock-Whitney House, watching closely over those that have come into her home. She is very protective of all the things in the house and becomes extremely agitated when people enter her bedroom.
You can hear her disembodied footsteps throughout the house and it is not uncommon to hear her pacing back and forth on the third floor—a place that the staff even refuses to visit alone!

At the Isaac Morse House you are likely to encounter children laughing and playing. This is no surprise since the first owner of the home, Mr. Morse, fathered 15 children within the walls!

Lights turning on and off of their own volition, disembodied voices, creepy EVPs (electronic voice phenomena), shadow figures lurking in the darkness, footsteps, doors opening and closing, objects moving, piano music playing in the middle of the night, full-bodied apparitions of an elderly woman and young children—these two beautiful historic homes hold a plethora of evidence just waiting to be documented by you!

The only question that remains—will you be brave enough to undergo a lone vigil on the third floor?!?!

History:

Two of the most historic and haunted locations in New England stand side-by-side in Wichendon, Massachusetts.

The quiet beauty of the Murdock-Whitney House and the Isaac Morse House speaks of days long past—except for the spirits that still reside within their walls!

Elisha Murdock, founder of E. Murdock Company, built the family home in 1850 for his wife, Rohanna and their three children: Ellen, Sophia and George.

The youngest of the family, and only son, met a young demise at the age of seven.

When Sophia inherited the property circa 1900, she made many additions to the original home blending classical and Victorian styles.

It was a warm and inviting home decorated and constructed in fine elegance. The spacious renovations allowed plenty of room for the lengthy visits of extended family as well as for entertaining friends. Sophia was known for her recitals where she would play her Chickering Concert Grand Piano.

Although the fine instrument has long since been donated to a local church, it is rumored that sometimes you can still hear the eerie tones of someone playing echoing throughout the home in the twilight hours of the morning.

For five generations the beautiful house was a home for the Murdock-Whitney family until December of 2000 when upon the owner’s death it was bequeathed to the Winchendon Historical Society.

With such a rich history, it is easy to understand why the family still watches over the property making certain that all who visit are entertained.

Right next door you will find the Isaac Morse House that was first built in 1790 by Robert Ruggles.

Isaac Morse, born in 1775, was the father of 15 children. His first wife, Miriam, bore ten children and his second wife, Frances gave birth to five.

Morse was a very influential man in Winchendon up until his death in 1860.

In 1939, the home was bought by Dr. Alton Skelton. It remained in their family until his second wife, Evangline, sold the house to the Porters in 2007. Today it belongs to the Winchendon Historical Society and serves as the Gift Shop. On the property there are several antiques and artworks that lend to the haunted credibility of the house. Steeped in history, you will not want to miss the opportunity to explore its depths and seek out the spirits that are waiting to tell you their stories!
... See MoreSee Less

14 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 24th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday July 25th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

84 People Interested  ·  5 People Going
Abbey Monastery Ghost Hunt

Abbey Monastery Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 24th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday July 25th, 2021, 5:00AM

The Abbey CC2951 E US Highway 50Canon City, CO81212 Location Map

This former Monastery in Colorado has a #haunted reputation like no other, and the the Paranormal Activity that has been captured and witnessed here is breathtaking!

Just how brave will you be?

Walk through the maze of dark corridors and feel the residual energy still lingering in this historic monastery. Investigate with us to uncover the secrets within these hallowed walls and try to communicate with persistent spirits who may still call The Abbey home.

Will we capture intelligent responses on EVPs, or will you feel as if you’re being followed, as previous guests have? Will you see apparitions of former monks wandering the halls? Or hear chanting emanating from the many chapels and echoing through the halls of The Abbey?

If you’re brave enough to explore the vast basement area, you may soon understand why some visitors have fled. A secret tunnel in the basement connecting the monastery to Ullathorne Hall was used to cross between buildings undetected… and it is one of the areas which has reports of a very dark and heavy presence.

The Abbey truly is haunted, which just leaves one question…Are you ready to undertake a lone vigil in the Gun Room?

In Canon City, CO, on over 200 acres of land, there stands an impressive, historic monastery now known as The Abbey – an event complex and winery that hosts events nearly every weekend. With Gothic towers, graceful arches and gorgeous stained-glass windows, it is a sight to behold. But perhaps there is much more to The Abbey than what guests normally see at a wedding, car show or class reunion.

Construction of the Abbey began in 1924, after Benedictine monks who traveled from Pennsylvania made their way to Breckenridge, Colorado for missionary work in 1886. Monks from other locales followed, and they eventually settled in Canon City in the early 1920s. Through the help of an intermediary, the 90 acres of land once known as Fruitmere Orchards was purchased for the Roman Catholic Church. At the time of the sale, the owner did not want to sell because the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan did not approve of such a transaction as they were opposed Catholics as well as any and all immigrants; which is why Simon Peter Smith, who along with seven priests and monks posing as his sons, made the purchase on behalf of the church.

Originally named Holy Cross, the Abbey was completed in 1925 and ended up costing three times the original estimate, for a total of $600,000.00, which was absorbed by other Benedictine Abbeys across the United States. The first abbot, Father Cyprian Bradley, was responsible for the creation of the boys’ school, but due to the Depression, the monastery encountered financial distress and Abbott Cyprian retired in 1933. Father Leonard Schwinn became the administrator and was able to overcome the Abbey’s financial woes. He was made abbot in 1937 and remained so for more than 26 years. Eventually the town grew up around the monastery and over time, many additions were made to the original Gothic Revival structure and other buildings were added to the campus, including a gymnasium, residence halls, classroom buildings, a field house and a dining hall.

There were three separate functions of the Abbey that were carried out by the monks: a boys’ school, Holy Cross College and Seminary, and Camp Holy Cross for boys aged 8 to 14. The boys’ preparatory high school was in operation from 1926 until 1985, beginning with just 35 students. By 1928, the monastery was housing 150 enrollees. Boys and young men from the area, and from all over the world, came to the Abbey School, and by 1972 there were about 250 students in attendance. However, in 1985, declining enrollment forced the closure of the school. The monastery remained open with approximately 20 elderly monks until it, too, closed in 2005 and the complex was sold in 2007.

Today, every Halloween, the Boy Scouts hold a haunted house in the basement of the Abbey, providing thrills and chills to those who like that kind of thing. But considering the complex history of the building of the monastery and the development of the schools, perhaps there are real ghosts who reside here, still taking care of the place they called home. In the decaying, shadow-filled halls of the monks’ living quarters, perhaps the some of the guardians can still be seen and heard? Come explore and experience this grand building and investigate with us where others have never been permitted and see what secrets we can uncover…
... See MoreSee Less

9 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 24th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday July 25th, 2021, 4:00AM

314 NW 4th St, Mineral Wells, TX 76067-4939, United States Location Map

The #haunted Nazareth Sanatorium, in #MineralWells #Texas, is a haven for the paranormal!

Our #Ghost Hunting events at The Nazareth Hospital and former Sanatorium will push your ghost hunting nerves to new limits.

We have exclusive access to this haunted location, including access to the 5th floor.

Just make sure you don’t leave before 2am, as the witching hour is waiting for you!

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Event Start Time: 8:30pm

Event Finish Time: 4:00am

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Your ghost hunt at Nazareth Sanatorium includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

-

The sun is shining, and the year is 1931.

The residents of Mineral Wells had no idea the Holy Sisters of Nazareth were making their way to this “Crazy” Haunted town to take up a life that would make a name for this small town in Texas.

With Minerals Wells already known for their “Crazy Water”, yes you read that right, this historic town has something so special in the water that hundreds of thousands of visitor’s flock here yearly.

And before you think that the “crazy water” is a myth, you simply have no idea…when you visit, and you will, make sure you take some home with you and find out why it is so special.

Let’s go back to 1931.

With the sisters climbing 7 floors, 14 flights and 126 steps, they settled into the top of this 46-room hospital, with an entourage of doctors and janitor.

Who knew that many of them would spend their final days in the Nazareth Hospital caring for the sick and those in need.

Many of them were unaware of what was about to unfold over the forthcoming years, and how much they would be needed.

The Nazareth Hospital would become a beacon of hope in Mineral Wells and no one could have predicted the events that would embed into these walls and remain unexplained.

Welcome to the Nazareth Hospital, sorry we meant, the Haunted Nazareth, and former Sanatorium Hospital.

The Holy Sisters bought the building for about $135,000 which would equate to more than $2 million today. The sisters were unaware that the land was used as a Bordello, and on that subject we will leave that part right here….

It housed its own crematorium which still sits on the site today, which was last used around the 1940’s – 1950’s.

You will soon understand that love and care was a fundamental part of the hospital.

In the 1960’s the hospital added on the name “sanatorium”.

This mighty building was a beacon of hope, protection and love, and it even survived two major fires!

Every inch of this hospital had a purpose, and every floor was used to its full potential.

The 1st floor housed Tuberculosis, Polio and Psychiatric Patients.

The 2nd floor was originally designated for administrative purposes.

The 3rd floor was used as the Chapel and patient rooms.

The 4th floor was the labor and delivery room.

The 5th floor was the surgical units.

The 6th floor Nun’s quarters

The 7th floor was occupied by the Priest, until he was relocated to the property behind the crematorium.

It is no wonder why the Nazareth Hospital has a haunted reputation, those very unique people who worked here still haunt this building, and those unfortunate souls who lost their lives still wander the very empty corridors.

Do you have what it takes to walk in the shadows of those departed?
... See MoreSee Less

24 People Interested
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Friday July 30th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday July 31st, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

2 People Interested
West Virginia Penitentiary Ghost Hunt

West Virginia Penitentiary Ghost Hunt

Friday July 30th, 2021, 9:00PM - Saturday July 31st, 2021, 5:00AM

West Virginia Penitentiary818 Jefferson AveMoundsville, WV26041 Location Map

#WestVirginia Penitentiary Ghost Hunt. We have exclusive access to this #haunted location. This location was featured on #Travel Channel. The #Paranormal, captured and experienced here makes this one of #America's most haunted locations in West Virginia

What you experience here may haunt you!
The harsh history of punishment, death and torture has left a dark imprint within the stone facade of West Virginia Penitentiary (also known as Moundsville).

Your ghost hunt at West Virginia Penitentiary includes the following:

Exclusive Private Overnight Access.

Psychic Medium Vigil (If Psychic/Medium is present).

90 Minute History Tour.

Free Time to privately explore to undertake your own vigils.

Group Vigil.

Small Group Vigils.

You will be ghost hunting in the most active areas of this very haunted location.

Exclusive access to areas that aren’t available to the public.

Access to the most haunted areas of this penitentiary.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Tea, Coffee, Hot Chocolate, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.

Paranormal -

The Haunted West Virginia Penitentiary is the one the most harrowing locations you’ll ever visit!

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location will test your nerve as we investigate all of the most active areas.

We have exclusive overnight access to the whole prison, including access to the “Sugar Shack”, “North Hall” and “Psych Ward”

Within the prison there are several paranormal hotspots that lure investigators and guests to seek answers. The Chapel where inmates and guards alike would make their pleas to a higher power;.

The Shower Cages that played hosts to murder, fights and rioting; Death Row where over 94 inmates served their final hours on this earthly plane; and the “Sugar Shack” where a multitude of illegal activities from rape to drugs to murder took place in the inmate recreation room.

Are the spirits reliving the nightmares they faced?

From full bodied apparitions to the slamming of cell doors and disembodied cries – the penitentiary offers the investigators and guests alike a bone chilling experience.

Will you be brave enough to undergo a lone vigil in the shadows of the electric chair, “Old Sparky”?

History -

When Virginia seceded with the South during the Civil War, West Virginia remained with the Union and therefore needed to build their own public institutions. The prison was built in Moundsville, WV opened its doors in 1876 and was in full operation until 1995.

During the life of the prison it was considered one of the most violent correctional facilities with over 36 inmate on inmate deaths. Perhaps the most notorious location within the facility was the prisoner recreation room known as “The Sugar Shack.”

The walls hid the deep dark secrets and illegal activities such as gambling, fighting, rape and murder.

One of the most violent deaths of an inmate was R.D.Wall, a known snitch. On October 8, 1929, Walls was jumped by three fellow prisoners who stabbed him to death with shivs.

The bloody massacre did not leave much for the guards to identity and rumor has it that this murder is linked to one of the first ghostly sightings within the walls of West Virginia Penitentiary.

Not all deaths were laid at the feet of inmates. West Virginia Penitentiary sent over 85 men to the gallows before it was ruled as cruel and unusual punishment in the 1950’s. All the hangings were public affairs where the community would gather to watch the inmates take their final swing.

When reviewing the cases of botched hangings there was a report of one prisoner who had been decapitated in the process.

The electric chair that was designed by an inmate to take the place of the gallows is still on display within the walls. Before Capital Punishment was outlawed by the state of West Virginia in 1965, 9 more prisoners met their fate in “Old Sparky.”

The violence of riots was commonplace, particularly in light of the overcrowding. One of the highly documented riots took place on March 20, 1973.

A hostage situation arose quickly during the full-scale riot. The prisoners holding the five prison guards threatened to kill them if the police or any guards fired gunshots or tear gas at them.

At the same time a fire was set and began to burn out of control in the basement of the prison. The prisoners barricaded themselves into the maximum-security section of the prison as they demanded to speak to the Governor. Another notable riot took place in January of 1986 (12 hostages).

During the time of operation there were a few escapees, all of them dangerous and violent criminals. 3 in April of 1988, 2 in November of the same year and 3 in February of 1992.

Violent Inmates:

Freddie Rakes – On a September evening in 1981, Rakes and two accomplices, a man and a juvenile girl, decided to rob a Lincoln County man named Ernie Neal, who was in his 70’s and lived by himself on a farm.

Rake, who knew the old man, knocked on Neal’s door. Rakes said his car was struck in a ditch, and asked Neal to get his tractor to pull the car out, and as the pair walked toward Neal’s barn Rakes hit the old man over the head with a rake. Rakes then shot Neal several times and ran over the old man with a truck, twice.

It was three days before Neal’s family found his body. Rakes and his accomplices fled to North Carolina, but were apprehended and brought back to West Virginia. During his trial, it was determined Rakes had been the one who actually committed the murder, and his accomplices were allowed to plead guilty to lesser crimes.

During the trial it was also determined that Rakes altered the shotgun shells he used to shoot Neal so that the bullets would make a harder impact. Testimony from the state medical examiner revealed Neal died from loss of blood caused by the first shotgun blast – to his knee – and that the old man was still alive when Rakes ran over him in the truck.

Dickie Wimmer – Wimmer was upset because his relationship with his wife was faltering, went to an Oceana apartment where she and their two children were staying on January 15, 1979. After a confrontation with his estranged wife, Wimmer shot her to death. He also shot to death his 6-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son.

Wimmer then went to a nearby apartment and told the residents to call an ambulance, saying his wife and children were sick. Medical personnel called police after seeing the trio had been shot, and Wimmer resisted police when they arrived. He initially was charged with obstructing a police officer, but that subsequently was changed to three counts of murder.
... See MoreSee Less

55 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 31st, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday August 1st, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

5 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 31st, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday August 1st, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

21 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
West Virginia Penitentiary Ghost Hunt

West Virginia Penitentiary Ghost Hunt

Saturday July 31st, 2021, 9:00PM - Sunday August 1st, 2021, 5:00AM

West Virginia Penitentiary818 Jefferson AveMoundsville, WV26041 Location Map

#WestVirginia Penitentiary Ghost Hunt. We have exclusive access to this #haunted location. This location was featured on #Travel Channel. The #Paranormal, captured and experienced here makes this one of #America's most haunted locations in West Virginia

What you experience here may haunt you!
The harsh history of punishment, death and torture has left a dark imprint within the stone facade of West Virginia Penitentiary (also known as Moundsville).

Your ghost hunt at West Virginia Penitentiary includes the following:

Exclusive Private Overnight Access.

Psychic Medium Vigil (If Psychic/Medium is present).

90 Minute History Tour.

Free Time to privately explore to undertake your own vigils.

Group Vigil.

Small Group Vigils.

You will be ghost hunting in the most active areas of this very haunted location.

Exclusive access to areas that aren’t available to the public.

Access to the most haunted areas of this penitentiary.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Tea, Coffee, Hot Chocolate, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.

Paranormal -

The Haunted West Virginia Penitentiary is the one the most harrowing locations you’ll ever visit!

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location will test your nerve as we investigate all of the most active areas.

We have exclusive overnight access to the whole prison, including access to the “Sugar Shack”, “North Hall” and “Psych Ward”

Within the prison there are several paranormal hotspots that lure investigators and guests to seek answers. The Chapel where inmates and guards alike would make their pleas to a higher power;.

The Shower Cages that played hosts to murder, fights and rioting; Death Row where over 94 inmates served their final hours on this earthly plane; and the “Sugar Shack” where a multitude of illegal activities from rape to drugs to murder took place in the inmate recreation room.

Are the spirits reliving the nightmares they faced?

From full bodied apparitions to the slamming of cell doors and disembodied cries – the penitentiary offers the investigators and guests alike a bone chilling experience.

Will you be brave enough to undergo a lone vigil in the shadows of the electric chair, “Old Sparky”?

History -

When Virginia seceded with the South during the Civil War, West Virginia remained with the Union and therefore needed to build their own public institutions. The prison was built in Moundsville, WV opened its doors in 1876 and was in full operation until 1995.

During the life of the prison it was considered one of the most violent correctional facilities with over 36 inmate on inmate deaths. Perhaps the most notorious location within the facility was the prisoner recreation room known as “The Sugar Shack.”

The walls hid the deep dark secrets and illegal activities such as gambling, fighting, rape and murder.

One of the most violent deaths of an inmate was R.D.Wall, a known snitch. On October 8, 1929, Walls was jumped by three fellow prisoners who stabbed him to death with shivs.

The bloody massacre did not leave much for the guards to identity and rumor has it that this murder is linked to one of the first ghostly sightings within the walls of West Virginia Penitentiary.

Not all deaths were laid at the feet of inmates. West Virginia Penitentiary sent over 85 men to the gallows before it was ruled as cruel and unusual punishment in the 1950’s. All the hangings were public affairs where the community would gather to watch the inmates take their final swing.

When reviewing the cases of botched hangings there was a report of one prisoner who had been decapitated in the process.

The electric chair that was designed by an inmate to take the place of the gallows is still on display within the walls. Before Capital Punishment was outlawed by the state of West Virginia in 1965, 9 more prisoners met their fate in “Old Sparky.”

The violence of riots was commonplace, particularly in light of the overcrowding. One of the highly documented riots took place on March 20, 1973.

A hostage situation arose quickly during the full-scale riot. The prisoners holding the five prison guards threatened to kill them if the police or any guards fired gunshots or tear gas at them.

At the same time a fire was set and began to burn out of control in the basement of the prison. The prisoners barricaded themselves into the maximum-security section of the prison as they demanded to speak to the Governor. Another notable riot took place in January of 1986 (12 hostages).

During the time of operation there were a few escapees, all of them dangerous and violent criminals. 3 in April of 1988, 2 in November of the same year and 3 in February of 1992.

Violent Inmates:

Freddie Rakes – On a September evening in 1981, Rakes and two accomplices, a man and a juvenile girl, decided to rob a Lincoln County man named Ernie Neal, who was in his 70’s and lived by himself on a farm.

Rake, who knew the old man, knocked on Neal’s door. Rakes said his car was struck in a ditch, and asked Neal to get his tractor to pull the car out, and as the pair walked toward Neal’s barn Rakes hit the old man over the head with a rake. Rakes then shot Neal several times and ran over the old man with a truck, twice.

It was three days before Neal’s family found his body. Rakes and his accomplices fled to North Carolina, but were apprehended and brought back to West Virginia. During his trial, it was determined Rakes had been the one who actually committed the murder, and his accomplices were allowed to plead guilty to lesser crimes.

During the trial it was also determined that Rakes altered the shotgun shells he used to shoot Neal so that the bullets would make a harder impact. Testimony from the state medical examiner revealed Neal died from loss of blood caused by the first shotgun blast – to his knee – and that the old man was still alive when Rakes ran over him in the truck.

Dickie Wimmer – Wimmer was upset because his relationship with his wife was faltering, went to an Oceana apartment where she and their two children were staying on January 15, 1979. After a confrontation with his estranged wife, Wimmer shot her to death. He also shot to death his 6-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son.

Wimmer then went to a nearby apartment and told the residents to call an ambulance, saying his wife and children were sick. Medical personnel called police after seeing the trio had been shot, and Wimmer resisted police when they arrived. He initially was charged with obstructing a police officer, but that subsequently was changed to three counts of murder.
... See MoreSee Less

293 People Interested  ·  12 People Going
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Thursday August 5th, 2021, 8:30PM - Friday August 6th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

64 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Wyeth Tootle Mansion Ghost Hunt

Wyeth Tootle Mansion Ghost Hunt

Friday August 6th, 2021, 8:15PM - Saturday August 7th, 2021, 2:30AM

Wyeth-Tootle Mansion1100 Charles StSaint Joseph, MO64501 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at Wyeth Tootle Mansion in St. Joseph, Missouri satisfies the intriguing lure of one of the most haunted locations in St. Josephs.

This very foreboding haunted location maybe beautiful in the daylight, but as night draws in, it’s haunted inhabitants come out.

William Goetz, St Josephs Museum board president helped purchase this mansion, around 1946.

Some of the paranormal that has been captured are the full blown apparitions of two children playing in one of the bedrooms, others have captured EVP’s which relate back to Mrs Tootle.

Is Wyeth Tootle Mansion haunted by some of the former patients from Glore Psychiatric Museum?

With macabre devices and haunted objects on display, there is no doubt that the spirits are still lingering and just waiting to share their stories with you!

St. Joseph is known for an extensive collection of beautiful mansions built in the late 1800s, and the Wyeth Tootle Mansion at the corner of 11th and Charles Streets is a prime example. With three floors, a tower and more than 40 rooms, it stands today as one of the best examples of St. Joseph’s late 19th century wealth and opulence, featuring stunning woodwork, hand-painted ceilings and imported stained glass.

In 1879, William and Eliza Wyeth hired architect Edmond Eckel to design a mansion resembling the castles they had seen on the Rhine River as they were traveling in Germany. This 43-room Gothic style mansion combines an example of the homes of early prominent St. Joseph residents with exhibits on the history of St. Joseph.

The first floor of the Wyeth Tootle Mansion has been partially restored to its Victorian grandeur. Old photographs of each room help visitors visualize the interior as it was around 1900. Each room’s ceiling is impressively different, from the cherubs that float above the Louis XVI parlor to the dark rich colors that cover the Moorish room. Ornate parquet floors and walnut woodwork change from room to room.

William and Eliza Wyeth moved to St. Joseph in 1859, and William soon developed his small wholesale-retail business into the prosperous Wyeth Hardware and Manufacturing Company and Wyeth Saddle Factory. In 1879, the Wyeths moved into this mansion with a panoramic view of the city and the Missouri River. However, they only lived in the home for eight years.

In the spring of 1887, the Wyeths sold the home to Mrs. Katherine Tootle. Mrs. Tootle was the recent widow of Milton Tootle. Milton’s obituary identified him as “the builder of the prosperity of St. Joseph and the leader of its ‘Golden Age.’ His business interests included mercantile establishments, the Western Bank of Missouri, and the Tootle Opera House. At his death, he had amassed the largest fortune of any individual in the city. Mrs. Tootle continued with many of his business interests.

After purchasing the home, she hired the New York firm of Pottier and Stymus to redecorate the interior. The main hall featured a walnut paneled ceiling and an elaborately carved staircase. The parquet floors, in keeping with the style of the time, were almost entirely covered with area rugs and furniture. Two stained-glass windows were added on the stairway landings. One resembled a Renaissance-style painting, and the other is of beautifully cut, stained glass. The ceilings werehand painted on canvas by a European artist.

Katherine’s son, Milton Tootle Jr., was the next occupant of the house. He and his wife Lillian added a large porch to the south side and a family dining room on the southeast side. A 1932 newspaper article described Milton Tootle’s home: “The ceilings were painted in Europe, and the walls were lined with heavy draperies, nearly an inch thick, with elaborate handwork appliqués made of materials the manufacture of which has become a lost art. And charming objects of art on every side intrigue the imagination and aid in the creating of an esthetic atmosphere.”

The rooms on the first floor were the French Reception Room of black and gold woodwork, the Louis the XVI Sitting Room with angels painted on the ceiling, the Library, the formal Dining Room, the Moorish Room with its Middle Eastern decor, and the Early American Family Dining Room. At the rear of the first floor were the servants’ dining and food preparation room and a kitchen.

When Milton Tootle, Jr., died in 1946 the home became available for purchase. William Goetz, St. Joseph Museum board president, and the M. K. Goetz Brewing Company donated the money to purchase the building and the city matched the amount to adapt the private home into a public museum.

Your ghost hunt at Wyeth Tootle Mansion includes the following:

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

475 People Interested  ·  13 People Going
Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Friday August 6th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday August 7th, 2021, 4:00AM

308 Lee Rd, Mineral Wells, TX 76067, United States Location Map

Our ghost hunts at the #haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

Your ghost hunt at the Beach Army Hospital includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks

History:

In the middle of a beautiful field in Mineral Wells, Texas stands an ominous building.

At over 90,000 square feet, the structure looks like something out of a James Bond movie. With more than three floors, this imposing building houses a two-level basement and more rooms than your mind will let you imagine. It is truly massive.

You have arrived at the Beach Army Hospital on the former Camp Wolters site.

With World War II still raging, Camp Wolter was ordered to serve as an infantry replacement training center on March 19th, 1941.

Camp Wolters housed as many as 30,000 soldiers at peak, thus requiring a centralized hospital for the six troop staging areas.

The original US Army hospital construction was a frame structure covered with gypsum board walls on the interior, and with metal siding on the exterior.

The hospital was equipped to handle 750 patients.

When Camp Wolters was transferred to the Air Force base, these buildings were in desperate need of very expensive repairs to bring them up to usable standard. At that time, the camp was renamed Wolters Air Force Base.

The Air Force requested and received funds to build a new hospital, and this is when the Beach Army Hospital became the building that it is today.

Construction started in the 1950’s and by March 29th, 1957 the Beach Army Hospital opened its doors as a medical institution. At a cost of $2.5 million dollars, which would equate to $9.3 million in today’s money.

This hospital was the first of its kind to specialize in aviation medicine for the United States Military.

It was designed to handle 100 patients, with an expansion capability for 200 patients. The facility was equipped with surgical, delivery, lavatory, kitchen and examination rooms.

Soon after completion, the United States Army gained control of the camp and it became the Primary Helicopter Center where all rotary wing pilots received their primary flight training.

Later – in June of 1963, the camp was renamed Fort Wolters.

Countless men, women, and families of the United States Military walked its halls and long corridors, whilst those that were hospitalized called it their home.

This left a permanent imprint on the building and on American History.

Shortly after 1970 this massive structure closed its doors.

Paranormal:

Our ghost hunts at the haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

The hospital has laid dormant and untouched for its nearly 50 years of abandonment. The aesthetics remain as well as those who once inhabited the property!

Make no mistake about it…….the paranormal activity that plagues this former hospital can be intense.

The unseen occupants taunt all those who visit, with whispers in ears, unpleasant touches, and faint smells of the past!

Due to the satanic worship, and “doors” opened, the paranormal experiences have intensified.

Around every corner and on every floor that you climb, you will be welcomed with the residual energy. The imprinted energy into the abandoned hospital beds, wheelchairs, and the morgue will last forever!

However, don’t let this fool you. The spirits are beyond intelligent and will interact in unbeknownst ways!

Are you ready for the unknown, and an adventure like no other?
... See MoreSee Less

21 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Friday August 6th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday August 7th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

34 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Wyeth Tootle Mansion Ghost Hunt

Wyeth Tootle Mansion Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 7th, 2021, 8:15PM - Sunday August 8th, 2021, 2:30PM

Wyeth-Tootle Mansion1100 Charles StSaint Joseph, MO64501 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at Wyeth Tootle Mansion in St. Joseph, Missouri satisfies the intriguing lure of one of the most haunted locations in St. Josephs.

This very foreboding haunted location maybe beautiful in the daylight, but as night draws in, it’s haunted inhabitants come out.

William Goetz, St Josephs Museum board president helped purchase this mansion, around 1946.

Some of the paranormal that has been captured are the full blown apparitions of two children playing in one of the bedrooms, others have captured EVP’s which relate back to Mrs Tootle.

Is Wyeth Tootle Mansion haunted by some of the former patients from Glore Psychiatric Museum?

With macabre devices and haunted objects on display, there is no doubt that the spirits are still lingering and just waiting to share their stories with you!

St. Joseph is known for an extensive collection of beautiful mansions built in the late 1800s, and the Wyeth Tootle Mansion at the corner of 11th and Charles Streets is a prime example. With three floors, a tower and more than 40 rooms, it stands today as one of the best examples of St. Joseph’s late 19th century wealth and opulence, featuring stunning woodwork, hand-painted ceilings and imported stained glass.

In 1879, William and Eliza Wyeth hired architect Edmond Eckel to design a mansion resembling the castles they had seen on the Rhine River as they were traveling in Germany. This 43-room Gothic style mansion combines an example of the homes of early prominent St. Joseph residents with exhibits on the history of St. Joseph.

The first floor of the Wyeth Tootle Mansion has been partially restored to its Victorian grandeur. Old photographs of each room help visitors visualize the interior as it was around 1900. Each room’s ceiling is impressively different, from the cherubs that float above the Louis XVI parlor to the dark rich colors that cover the Moorish room. Ornate parquet floors and walnut woodwork change from room to room.

William and Eliza Wyeth moved to St. Joseph in 1859, and William soon developed his small wholesale-retail business into the prosperous Wyeth Hardware and Manufacturing Company and Wyeth Saddle Factory. In 1879, the Wyeths moved into this mansion with a panoramic view of the city and the Missouri River. However, they only lived in the home for eight years.

In the spring of 1887, the Wyeths sold the home to Mrs. Katherine Tootle. Mrs. Tootle was the recent widow of Milton Tootle. Milton’s obituary identified him as “the builder of the prosperity of St. Joseph and the leader of its ‘Golden Age.’ His business interests included mercantile establishments, the Western Bank of Missouri, and the Tootle Opera House. At his death, he had amassed the largest fortune of any individual in the city. Mrs. Tootle continued with many of his business interests.

After purchasing the home, she hired the New York firm of Pottier and Stymus to redecorate the interior. The main hall featured a walnut paneled ceiling and an elaborately carved staircase. The parquet floors, in keeping with the style of the time, were almost entirely covered with area rugs and furniture. Two stained-glass windows were added on the stairway landings. One resembled a Renaissance-style painting, and the other is of beautifully cut, stained glass. The ceilings werehand painted on canvas by a European artist.

Katherine’s son, Milton Tootle Jr., was the next occupant of the house. He and his wife Lillian added a large porch to the south side and a family dining room on the southeast side. A 1932 newspaper article described Milton Tootle’s home: “The ceilings were painted in Europe, and the walls were lined with heavy draperies, nearly an inch thick, with elaborate handwork appliqués made of materials the manufacture of which has become a lost art. And charming objects of art on every side intrigue the imagination and aid in the creating of an esthetic atmosphere.”

The rooms on the first floor were the French Reception Room of black and gold woodwork, the Louis the XVI Sitting Room with angels painted on the ceiling, the Library, the formal Dining Room, the Moorish Room with its Middle Eastern decor, and the Early American Family Dining Room. At the rear of the first floor were the servants’ dining and food preparation room and a kitchen.

When Milton Tootle, Jr., died in 1946 the home became available for purchase. William Goetz, St. Joseph Museum board president, and the M. K. Goetz Brewing Company donated the money to purchase the building and the city matched the amount to adapt the private home into a public museum.

Your ghost hunt at Wyeth Tootle Mansion includes the following:

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

290 People Interested  ·  10 People Going
Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Beach Army Hospital Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 7th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday August 8th, 2021, 4:00AM

308 Lee Rd, Mineral Wells, TX 76067, United States Location Map

Our ghost hunts at the #haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

Your ghost hunt at the Beach Army Hospital includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks

History:

In the middle of a beautiful field in Mineral Wells, Texas stands an ominous building.

At over 90,000 square feet, the structure looks like something out of a James Bond movie. With more than three floors, this imposing building houses a two-level basement and more rooms than your mind will let you imagine. It is truly massive.

You have arrived at the Beach Army Hospital on the former Camp Wolters site.

With World War II still raging, Camp Wolter was ordered to serve as an infantry replacement training center on March 19th, 1941.

Camp Wolters housed as many as 30,000 soldiers at peak, thus requiring a centralized hospital for the six troop staging areas.

The original US Army hospital construction was a frame structure covered with gypsum board walls on the interior, and with metal siding on the exterior.

The hospital was equipped to handle 750 patients.

When Camp Wolters was transferred to the Air Force base, these buildings were in desperate need of very expensive repairs to bring them up to usable standard. At that time, the camp was renamed Wolters Air Force Base.

The Air Force requested and received funds to build a new hospital, and this is when the Beach Army Hospital became the building that it is today.

Construction started in the 1950’s and by March 29th, 1957 the Beach Army Hospital opened its doors as a medical institution. At a cost of $2.5 million dollars, which would equate to $9.3 million in today’s money.

This hospital was the first of its kind to specialize in aviation medicine for the United States Military.

It was designed to handle 100 patients, with an expansion capability for 200 patients. The facility was equipped with surgical, delivery, lavatory, kitchen and examination rooms.

Soon after completion, the United States Army gained control of the camp and it became the Primary Helicopter Center where all rotary wing pilots received their primary flight training.

Later – in June of 1963, the camp was renamed Fort Wolters.

Countless men, women, and families of the United States Military walked its halls and long corridors, whilst those that were hospitalized called it their home.

This left a permanent imprint on the building and on American History.

Shortly after 1970 this massive structure closed its doors.

Paranormal:

Our ghost hunts at the haunted Beach Army Hospital are not for the faint of heart.

The haunted Beach Army Hospital is one of the most haunted locations in Mineral Wells, Texas and the paranormal reports have become a daily occurrence.

Activity ranges from poltergeist, disembodied voices, to full bodied apparitions. The most harrowing happenings have been the Satanic Worship being conducted on-site.

The hospital has laid dormant and untouched for its nearly 50 years of abandonment. The aesthetics remain as well as those who once inhabited the property!

Make no mistake about it…….the paranormal activity that plagues this former hospital can be intense.

The unseen occupants taunt all those who visit, with whispers in ears, unpleasant touches, and faint smells of the past!

Due to the satanic worship, and “doors” opened, the paranormal experiences have intensified.

Around every corner and on every floor that you climb, you will be welcomed with the residual energy. The imprinted energy into the abandoned hospital beds, wheelchairs, and the morgue will last forever!

However, don’t let this fool you. The spirits are beyond intelligent and will interact in unbeknownst ways!

Are you ready for the unknown, and an adventure like no other?
... See MoreSee Less

5 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 7th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday August 8th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

23 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Sunday August 8th, 2021, 8:30PM - Monday August 9th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

44 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

Friday August 13th, 2021, 8:00PM - Saturday August 14th, 2021, 3:00AM

Squirrel Cage Jail of Pottawattamie County, Iowa226 Pearl StCouncil Bluffs, IA51503 Location Map

The #haunted Squirrel Cage Jail has been featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures. The Squirrel Jail in Iowa is one of the most haunted jails. It was also home to the "Jake Bird" the evil serial killer who took the lives of 44 victims!

Are you ready to explore a unique piece of history and find out who may still dwell within the confines of this unusual lockup?

Constructed in 1885 and in operation as a jail until 1969, the Squirrel Cage Jail offers guests a chance to experience what life may have been like doing time (or working in) a “human-rotary” style jail. One of only three such jails of still in existence, this strange building design surely holds secrets from the past.

Your ghost hunt at Squirrel Cage Jail includes the following:

Access to the most haunted areas of this prison,
Smaller Group Sizes,
45 Minute History tour,
Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present),
Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators,
Lone Vigils,
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers,
Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water

Paranormal:

Not surprisingly, there are a number of reports of paranormal activity within the structure, some dating back to when the jail was still in operation. It is said a jailer from the 1950s named Bill Foster refused to use the fourth floor as his living quarters because of “strange goings-on up there,” which including footsteps when no one was up there and odd sensations when he went upstairs to investigate.

One former tour guide has claimed to have seen the spirit of J.M. Carter, the gentleman who supervised the building’s construction in 1885. He was reportedly the first resident of the fourth floor living quarters. Perhaps he has stuck around to keep an eye on things to this day.

Others have recounted seeing a full-bodied apparition, also on the top floor, who they believe may be another former jailer named Otto Gufath. Still another person stated she saw the ghost of what appeared to be a sad little girl dressed in gray, sitting inside a cell which was completely inaccessible at the time.

Over the years, visitors and employees alike have described a number of possible paranormal happenings, including feeling like they are being watched, having their clothes tugged on, hearing disembodied voices, doors opening and closing by themselves, seeing strange lights and hearing odd, unexplainable noises.

Spend some time with us and see if you can discover which spirits may still be lingering here, trying to communicate with the living – and what they might have to say about the conditions they endured at the Squirrel Cage Jail.

Location History:

In Council Bluffs, Iowa there stands a stately brick building erected in the late 1800s which houses a most remarkable lockup known as the Squirrel Cage Jail. One of only 18 of its kind built, this “human rotary’ jail is now only one of three still in existence, and the only one that stands three stories tall.

Constructed in 1885 under the supervision of J. M. Carter, the jail features 10 pie-shaped cells on each level, and each cell was meant to house between two – and some say up to six – prisoners at a time. This bizarre design was the brainchild of Indianapolis natives William H. Brown and Benjamin F. Haugh, and the intention was to “provide maximum security with minimum jailer attention,” – thus cutting down on the number of personnel needed to run the prison.

The jailer’s office, kitchen, trustee cells and women’s quarters were located in the front of the building on the first floor and living quarters for the jailer were on the fourth floor. The three levles of cells are placed on a central carousel or drum which was turned using a hand crank. The bars (or cage) are stationary and have only one opening on each floor. The cells were rotated using the hand crank until each one would line up with the cage opening so that prisoners could be accessed, but only one cell at a time.

Over time, the rotating carousel housing the cells became more difficult to turn and often became stuck, making it nearly impossible to get food or medical assistance to prisoners if needed. Inmates often suffered broken arms and legs when they would mistakenly (or deliberately) stick their limbs through the individual cell bars while the drum was being spun.

However, there are only four recorded deaths on the property during its more than 80-year run as a prison. One inmate died from and apparent heart attack. Another was found hanged in his cell. A third prisoner reportedly died when he fell three stories after trying to climb up the cage to carve his name in the ceiling. The fourth death was rumored to be that of an officer of the local police department who accidently shot himself during the confusion of the Farmer’s Holiday Association Strike in 1932 when 84 protesters were arrested and jailed.

The Squirrel Cage Jail was in operation until 1969, when it was deemed “unfit for human habitation.” In 1971, after the prison was shut down and its remaining prisoners moved to other facilities, it was obtained by the Council Bluffs Park Board. They were successful in getting the structure listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.The Historical Society of Pottawattamie County – who owns and operates the building today – headed the endeavor to protect the jail in 1977, and it is now a museum which offers a glimpse into the unique cultural and architectural history of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
... See MoreSee Less

2 People Interested
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Friday August 13th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday August 14th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

3 People Interested  ·  4 People Going
Idaho TB Hospital Ghost Hunt

Idaho TB Hospital Ghost Hunt

Friday August 13th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday August 14th, 2021, 4:00AM

Gooding University Inn and Resort301 University Ave EGooding, ID83330 Location Map

Idaho Tuberculosis Hospital Ghost Hunt. This location was featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures and Only In Your State

This #haunted location is well known across the state of Idaho, the many rumors of its hauntings are correct! The Paranormal Activity that has been captured and witnessed here will make you question if you really do want to sleep here!

Sleepover and non sleepover tickets available.


Some of the paranormal experienced here, shadow figures, full-bodied apparitions, doors banging, knocks, whistles and items being removed. The sense of never being alone is one of the most reported paranormal phenomena. Where ever you venture off too, you are never alone! Are you brave enough to set foot in this haunted hospital?

It’s one thing to visit a “haunted” location by day but to actually spend the night in one is another story. Today, the Gooding University Inn operates as a quaint little resort in southern Idaho. The century-old structure is bursting with history, but it’s also considered one of the region’s most haunted destinations. Newly renovated and welcoming visitors with open arms, the structure doesn’t seem very haunting. However, you never know what you might come across after a night spent in this ex-hospital.

Located in the middle of vast swaths of farmland is the Gooding University Inn and Resort. It may not look like much of a resort from the outside, but it welcomes visitors all year long who are looking for a retreat in southern Idaho. However, this building also contains a creepy history that has some people saying it's haunted...

The structure was built in 1917 when it was first established as Gooding College. At the time, Gooding College was the only place of higher education in Idaho in between Caldwell and Pocatello. However, the school shut down in 1938.

The structure opened back up in the 1940s when it was converted into a tuberculosis hospital. It was considered one of the most advanced hospitals to specialize in TB in the entire country during its time but it closed down officially in 1976.

After remaining empty for many decades, the structure opened back up in 2004. This time, it was known as "The Get Inn Bed and Breakfast". This unique B&B capitalized on its haunted reputation and welcomed paranormal investigators to spend the night. Numerous ghost hunting groups have tried their hand at exploring the ex-hospital for any sort of ghostly activity.

In fact, investigators concluded that the building is indeed a hot spot for paranormal activity. Witnesses have reported seeing apparitions of an old man in a white coat along with a woman with a young girl. Mysterious whispers and footsteps down empty hallways are also a common unexplained occurrence. There's no doubt that this building saw a lot of pain during its time as a hospital, and it seems that some patients have never really left it.

History by: Only In Your State

Additional Information:

Your ghost hunt at The Old Idaho TB Hospital includes the following:

Overnight Ghost Hunt until 4am for non sleepover guests, for sleepover guests till 10am.
Psychic Medium.
Medium Vigil.
Group Séances.
Structured Vigils.
Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team,
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters,
Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda,
Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

85 People Interested  ·  4 People Going
The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 14th, 2021, 8:00PM - Sunday August 15th, 2021, 3:00AM

Squirrel Cage Jail of Pottawattamie County, Iowa226 Pearl StCouncil Bluffs, IA51503 Location Map

The #haunted Squirrel Cage Jail has been featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures. The Squirrel Jail in Iowa is one of the most haunted jails. It was also home to the "Jake Bird" the evil serial killer who took the lives of 44 victims!

Are you ready to explore a unique piece of history and find out who may still dwell within the confines of this unusual lockup?

Constructed in 1885 and in operation as a jail until 1969, the Squirrel Cage Jail offers guests a chance to experience what life may have been like doing time (or working in) a “human-rotary” style jail. One of only three such jails of still in existence, this strange building design surely holds secrets from the past.

Your ghost hunt at Squirrel Cage Jail includes the following:

Access to the most haunted areas of this prison,
Smaller Group Sizes,
45 Minute History tour,
Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present),
Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators,
Lone Vigils,
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers,
Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water

Paranormal:

Not surprisingly, there are a number of reports of paranormal activity within the structure, some dating back to when the jail was still in operation. It is said a jailer from the 1950s named Bill Foster refused to use the fourth floor as his living quarters because of “strange goings-on up there,” which including footsteps when no one was up there and odd sensations when he went upstairs to investigate.

One former tour guide has claimed to have seen the spirit of J.M. Carter, the gentleman who supervised the building’s construction in 1885. He was reportedly the first resident of the fourth floor living quarters. Perhaps he has stuck around to keep an eye on things to this day.

Others have recounted seeing a full-bodied apparition, also on the top floor, who they believe may be another former jailer named Otto Gufath. Still another person stated she saw the ghost of what appeared to be a sad little girl dressed in gray, sitting inside a cell which was completely inaccessible at the time.

Over the years, visitors and employees alike have described a number of possible paranormal happenings, including feeling like they are being watched, having their clothes tugged on, hearing disembodied voices, doors opening and closing by themselves, seeing strange lights and hearing odd, unexplainable noises.

Spend some time with us and see if you can discover which spirits may still be lingering here, trying to communicate with the living – and what they might have to say about the conditions they endured at the Squirrel Cage Jail.

Location History:

In Council Bluffs, Iowa there stands a stately brick building erected in the late 1800s which houses a most remarkable lockup known as the Squirrel Cage Jail. One of only 18 of its kind built, this “human rotary’ jail is now only one of three still in existence, and the only one that stands three stories tall.

Constructed in 1885 under the supervision of J. M. Carter, the jail features 10 pie-shaped cells on each level, and each cell was meant to house between two – and some say up to six – prisoners at a time. This bizarre design was the brainchild of Indianapolis natives William H. Brown and Benjamin F. Haugh, and the intention was to “provide maximum security with minimum jailer attention,” – thus cutting down on the number of personnel needed to run the prison.

The jailer’s office, kitchen, trustee cells and women’s quarters were located in the front of the building on the first floor and living quarters for the jailer were on the fourth floor. The three levles of cells are placed on a central carousel or drum which was turned using a hand crank. The bars (or cage) are stationary and have only one opening on each floor. The cells were rotated using the hand crank until each one would line up with the cage opening so that prisoners could be accessed, but only one cell at a time.

Over time, the rotating carousel housing the cells became more difficult to turn and often became stuck, making it nearly impossible to get food or medical assistance to prisoners if needed. Inmates often suffered broken arms and legs when they would mistakenly (or deliberately) stick their limbs through the individual cell bars while the drum was being spun.

However, there are only four recorded deaths on the property during its more than 80-year run as a prison. One inmate died from and apparent heart attack. Another was found hanged in his cell. A third prisoner reportedly died when he fell three stories after trying to climb up the cage to carve his name in the ceiling. The fourth death was rumored to be that of an officer of the local police department who accidently shot himself during the confusion of the Farmer’s Holiday Association Strike in 1932 when 84 protesters were arrested and jailed.

The Squirrel Cage Jail was in operation until 1969, when it was deemed “unfit for human habitation.” In 1971, after the prison was shut down and its remaining prisoners moved to other facilities, it was obtained by the Council Bluffs Park Board. They were successful in getting the structure listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.The Historical Society of Pottawattamie County – who owns and operates the building today – headed the endeavor to protect the jail in 1977, and it is now a museum which offers a glimpse into the unique cultural and architectural history of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
... See MoreSee Less

7 People Interested  ·  1 People Going
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 14th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday August 15th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

1 People Interested
Old Montana State Prison Ghost Hunt

Old Montana State Prison Ghost Hunt

Friday August 20th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday August 21st, 2021, 5:00AM

Old Montana Prison Complex1106 Main StDeer Lodge, MT59722 Location Map

Old Montana Prison Ghost Hunt | Deer Lodge, Montana | We have exclusive overnight access to this very #haunted location in Montana.

This location was featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures

We have access to the most haunted areas including the Death Tower, The Administration House, The Clark Theatre, Maximum Security, The Hole and The Chapel.

The darkness, pain and sinister suffering is still embedded into the walls of this very haunted prison. Old Montana State Prison has a haunted reputation that will send a shiver down your spine.

On April 16th, 1959, Jerry Myles and Lee Smart led twelve inmates in a riot which left Deputy Warden Ted Rothe dead. They took eighteen prison employees and five stool pigeon inmates as hostages, soaked rags with flammable liquid and threatened to burn them alive.

After thirty-six hours of mounting tension, Warden Floyd Powell implemented a daring rescue attempt. The National Guard fired a bazooka at the tower where the ringleaders were headquartered. Meanwhile, a team of men burst through the door in the west wall, crossed the yard, and entered the Cell House, freeing the hostages.

Myles and Smart were found dead of an apparent murder-suicide at the top floor of the tower, is it these two lovers that still haunt the Death Tower?

Your time will be spent ghost hunting in the most active areas and we have exclusive overnight access to the main key areas of this prison.

Full bodied apparitions, disembodied voices and items being thrown is just a small amount of the reported paranormal experiences captured here.

Will you be brave enough to venture a lone vigil in the depths of darkness that swirl around this former prison?!?

Like other fledgling territories in the 19th century American West, Montana had become wild when the gold rush attracted not only those wishing to find their fortunes, but also thieves, gamblers, and murderers. For several years following the gold discoveries of 1862, the Montana Vigilantes took it upon themselves to punish these many offenders in the lawless land of Montana. Finally, seeing a need for more organized forms of law enforcement, the Montana Territorial Legislature requested funds for a prison during its winter session of 1866-67. The United States Congress agreed that the territory needed a prison, approved the request for funding, and Deer Lodge was chosen for the site of the new Territorial Prison.

However, they soon found that the funding was inadequate causing revisions to the plans and many delays. Construction finally began in the spring of 1870 with convict labor, and the prison finally received its first convict on July 2, 1871.

Almost from the beginning, the prison was deemed inadequate and overcrowded, a condition that would result in slow, but continual construction at the prison for the next fifty years. When Montana became the forty-first state on November 8, 1889, the prison became Montana's responsibility. Finding it expensive to operate, the Board of Prison Commissioners contracted out the entire Prison operation in 1890. Colonel Thomas McTague and Frank Conley of Deer Lodge received the contract, which paid them seventy cents per prisoner per day.

Frank Conley became the new warden, a post that he would continue to hold until 1921. Over the next thirty years, Conley shaped the philosophy and appearance of the prison. Believing the prisoners should work, Conley began to update the prison by first replacing its twelve-foot wooden fence with the massive sandstone wall in 1893. Four and a half feet thick, the wall formed a solid perimeter for the prison. He also began to build a new log cell house to reduce the prison crowding.

As a further measure to reduce crowding, put the prisoners to work, and generate income from the prison, outside prison camps were established where prisoners would live and be "hired out” for both public and private work. This worked so well that by the late 1890’s approximately one-third of the prisoners worked outside the prison. At these camps, which housed about 75 prisoners each, inmates enjoyed a relatively high degree of freedom with neither chains nor cells restricting them. However, "outside work” was a privilege, and the slightest infraction of the rules would immediately send a prisoner back behind prison walls.

By the second decade of the twentieth century, about fifty percent of the inmates were working outside the penitentiary, traveling throughout Montana erecting numerous state buildings, paving more than five hundred miles of roads, and working on eleven different ranches that provided food for state-owned institutions.

In 1908, the prison witnessed one of its most tragic events when two prisoners by the names of George Rock and William Hayes attempted to escape. Fleeing from the Federal Building, their failed attempt resulted in the death of Deputy Warden John Robinson and Warden Frank Conley was required to get 103 stitches in his back and neck from stab wounds he received from the inmates. As a result, George Rock was hanged inside the prison yard that very year, and William Hayes met a similar fate the following year. They were the only inmates to be executed in the prison.

Not all the inmates were so violent however, and one was down right liked by the guards and prisoners. At the age of 40, Pete Eitner was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in 1918.

A model prisoner, he was assigned to tend to the prison turkeys and soon garnered the nickname of "Turkey Pete." As he aged, he began to lose some of his mental facilities and when a man stopped one day to admire his turkeys, Eitner sold him the entire flock for 25 cents each. This ended his turkey tending days, but that was ok, because he soon fantasized a new "job" as the owner and administrator of the prison. Prison officials humored him, "allowing" Eitner to "run" the prison from his cell. Fake checks were printed for him, with which he paid the prison expenses and payroll. He would also tell anyone who would listen that he had the coffee crop in Brazil one year, sold pink alligators, ships to the navy, and grasshopper legs to Fidel Castro.

When Turkey Pete died in 1967 at age 89, his cell (#1) was retired. His funeral was the only one ever held within the walls of the prison. Today, Cell #1 displays photos of Turkey Pete, as well as his few belongings.

Inside the prison walls, construction also continued with the building of a women’s prison, additional dormitories for the men, a store building, laundry, and dining room. In 1919, a 1,000 seat prison theater was built with funding donated by Senator William A. Clark, Jr.

Protests from labor unions and security concerns put an end to outside work in the 1920s; however, food production continued at the thirty-thousand-acre prison-owned ranch. Work inside the prison continued in various industries including cobbler and upholstery shops, and a garment industry that made clothes for state wards. A state license plate factory began production in the late 1920’s.

Though Conley’s administration made drastic improvements to the prison, it continually suffered from overcrowding through the decades.

On April 16, 1959, the prison suffered a major riot when two inmates by the names of Jerry Myles and Lee Smart, Jr. led some 12 inmates in an escape attempt. In the melee, Deputy Warden Theodore Rothe was shot and killed, and Warden Powell was temporarily held hostage.

The hostages were held for three days while the riot raged on. After the National Guard was brought in, the two ringleaders died in a murder-suicide, When Myles shot Smart and then turned the gun on himself.

Finally, the old and overcrowded prison was closed In 1979, and its prisoners moved to a new facility, five miles west of Deer Lodge.
... See MoreSee Less

3 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Friday August 20th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday August 21st, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

23 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 21st, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday August 22nd, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

46 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
Glore Psychiatric Museum Ghost Hunt

Glore Psychiatric Museum Ghost Hunt

Friday August 27th, 2021, 8:15PM - Saturday August 28th, 2021, 2:30AM

Glore Psychiatric MuseumSaint Joseph, MO Location Map

The #Haunted Glore Psychiatric Museum is one haunted location in Missouri! It's educational and its haunted! We have exclusive overnight access to this very haunted location, including access to the very foreboding underground tunnel that now connects into the prison.

You will also have access to the museum to participate in your own history and walk around and this is included in the price. Access is available from 10am until 5pm. Last entry is at 3:30pm. You will then return at 8:15pm for the overnight Ghost Hunt.

Ghost hunting #haunted Is This Paranormal

The Glore Psychiatric Museum in St. Joseph, Missouri satisfies the intriguing lure of the Lunatic Asylums of the 19th and 20th Century. Listed as one of the top 50 unique museums in the world and one of the most haunted locations in Missouri, the museum is housed in the state’s former lunatic asylum where the patients still linger in the shadows!

The hauntings that have been documented and experienced in the museum started long before the St. Joseph’s State Hospital closed its doors and converted the corridors for educational purposes. With macabre devices and haunted objects on display, there is no doubt that the spirits are still lingering and just waiting to share their stories with you! Paranormal investigators from around the globe have flocked to the location to document the evolutionary history of mental illness treatment and communicate with those who were victims to their barbaric practices!

The facility opened in 1872 as the State Lunatic Asylum No. 2. Over the course of 127 years they expanded from 275 to 3,000 beds. The thousands of patients ranged from those who were diagnosed as criminally insane to those who were able to receive rehabilitating treatment and be reintegrated into society. Among those were the few unfortunate souls who were committed by their families because they “…had become lazy with [their] housework.”

All of the patients were submitted to state-of-the-art mental illness treatments that were considered helpful at the time but in retrospect we realize that some of these so-called treatments were often the cause and not the cure for insanity. Centrifuge therapy (spinning a patient in a device at high speeds), hydrotherapy (from ice baths that could last for days to scalding patients), cages used to contain patients until they “calmed down,” lobotomies, shock therapy, fever therapy (elevating body temperatures to abnormal levels, often used to treat syphilis which was rampant at the facility), tranquilizer chairs (strapping patients to a chair for weeks at a time using bloodletting with leaches and knives), and several other treatments that horrify our modern minds were all used at St. Joseph’s State Hospital.

The horrifying cures obviously left a terrified mark on the building, but other contributing factors may have led to the hauntings of the corridors. Many of the patients that were housed at the asylum never had visitors because their families simply abandoned them after they were committed. In the early years the graves of the patients were unmarked before they were simply engraved with an identifying number. Does the lack of acknowledgement in their final resting place leave the spirits feeling as unwanted in death as they felt in life?

Around the time George Glore started the display of historical artifacts in the evolution of mental illness treatments in 1967, St. Joseph’s State Hospital began to earn its reputation for being haunted. The staff would see shadow figures and apparitions roaming the hallways and always felt as if they were being watched. There was one patient who was known for her interaction with the “spirits” of the institution—she created art, wrote poems and songs detailing her experience with the paranormal activity.

If you’re investigating the morgue, watch for the full-bodied apparition of a man. He’s often been seen around the elevators and several investigators have caught an EVP (electronic voice phenomena) of a male voice screaming “GET OUT!” Disembodied whispering is often reported as well as a female voice calling out your name when no one else is around! Moaning, whimpering, crying—it’s easy to imagine that the sounds are patients still looking for someone who wants to be their friend.

The only question that remains—are you brave enough to undergo a lone vigil in the underground tunnels?
... See MoreSee Less

8 People Interested
Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Friday August 27th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday August 28th, 2021, 4:00AM

314 NW 4th St, Mineral Wells, TX 76067-4939, United States Location Map

The #haunted Nazareth Sanatorium, in #MineralWells #Texas, is a haven for the paranormal!

Our #Ghost Hunting events at The Nazareth Hospital and former Sanatorium will push your ghost hunting nerves to new limits.

We have exclusive access to this haunted location, including access to the 5th floor.

Just make sure you don’t leave before 2am, as the witching hour is waiting for you!

-

Event Start Time: 8:30pm

Event Finish Time: 4:00am

-

Your ghost hunt at Nazareth Sanatorium includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

-

The sun is shining, and the year is 1931.

The residents of Mineral Wells had no idea the Holy Sisters of Nazareth were making their way to this “Crazy” Haunted town to take up a life that would make a name for this small town in Texas.

With Minerals Wells already known for their “Crazy Water”, yes you read that right, this historic town has something so special in the water that hundreds of thousands of visitor’s flock here yearly.

And before you think that the “crazy water” is a myth, you simply have no idea…when you visit, and you will, make sure you take some home with you and find out why it is so special.

Let’s go back to 1931.

With the sisters climbing 7 floors, 14 flights and 126 steps, they settled into the top of this 46-room hospital, with an entourage of doctors and janitor.

Who knew that many of them would spend their final days in the Nazareth Hospital caring for the sick and those in need.

Many of them were unaware of what was about to unfold over the forthcoming years, and how much they would be needed.

The Nazareth Hospital would become a beacon of hope in Mineral Wells and no one could have predicted the events that would embed into these walls and remain unexplained.

Welcome to the Nazareth Hospital, sorry we meant, the Haunted Nazareth, and former Sanatorium Hospital.

The Holy Sisters bought the building for about $135,000 which would equate to more than $2 million today. The sisters were unaware that the land was used as a Bordello, and on that subject we will leave that part right here….

It housed its own crematorium which still sits on the site today, which was last used around the 1940’s – 1950’s.

You will soon understand that love and care was a fundamental part of the hospital.

In the 1960’s the hospital added on the name “sanatorium”.

This mighty building was a beacon of hope, protection and love, and it even survived two major fires!

Every inch of this hospital had a purpose, and every floor was used to its full potential.

The 1st floor housed Tuberculosis, Polio and Psychiatric Patients.

The 2nd floor was originally designated for administrative purposes.

The 3rd floor was used as the Chapel and patient rooms.

The 4th floor was the labor and delivery room.

The 5th floor was the surgical units.

The 6th floor Nun’s quarters

The 7th floor was occupied by the Priest, until he was relocated to the property behind the crematorium.

It is no wonder why the Nazareth Hospital has a haunted reputation, those very unique people who worked here still haunt this building, and those unfortunate souls who lost their lives still wander the very empty corridors.

Do you have what it takes to walk in the shadows of those departed?
... See MoreSee Less

9 People Interested
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Friday August 27th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday August 28th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

2 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Friday August 27th, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday August 28th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

26 People Interested
Glore Psychiatric Museum Ghost Hunt

Glore Psychiatric Museum Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 28th, 2021, 8:15PM - Sunday August 29th, 2021, 2:30AM

Glore Psychiatric MuseumSaint Joseph, MO Location Map

The #Haunted Glore Psychiatric Museum is one haunted location in Missouri! It's educational and its haunted! We have exclusive overnight access to this very haunted location, including access to the very foreboding underground tunnel that now connects into the prison.

You will also have access to the museum to participate in your own history and walk around and this is included in the price. Access is available from 10am until 5pm. Last entry is at 3:30pm. You will then return at 8:15pm for the overnight Ghost Hunt.

Ghost hunting #haunted Is This Paranormal

The Glore Psychiatric Museum in St. Joseph, Missouri satisfies the intriguing lure of the Lunatic Asylums of the 19th and 20th Century. Listed as one of the top 50 unique museums in the world and one of the most haunted locations in Missouri, the museum is housed in the state’s former lunatic asylum where the patients still linger in the shadows!

The hauntings that have been documented and experienced in the museum started long before the St. Joseph’s State Hospital closed its doors and converted the corridors for educational purposes. With macabre devices and haunted objects on display, there is no doubt that the spirits are still lingering and just waiting to share their stories with you! Paranormal investigators from around the globe have flocked to the location to document the evolutionary history of mental illness treatment and communicate with those who were victims to their barbaric practices!

The facility opened in 1872 as the State Lunatic Asylum No. 2. Over the course of 127 years they expanded from 275 to 3,000 beds. The thousands of patients ranged from those who were diagnosed as criminally insane to those who were able to receive rehabilitating treatment and be reintegrated into society. Among those were the few unfortunate souls who were committed by their families because they “…had become lazy with [their] housework.”

All of the patients were submitted to state-of-the-art mental illness treatments that were considered helpful at the time but in retrospect we realize that some of these so-called treatments were often the cause and not the cure for insanity. Centrifuge therapy (spinning a patient in a device at high speeds), hydrotherapy (from ice baths that could last for days to scalding patients), cages used to contain patients until they “calmed down,” lobotomies, shock therapy, fever therapy (elevating body temperatures to abnormal levels, often used to treat syphilis which was rampant at the facility), tranquilizer chairs (strapping patients to a chair for weeks at a time using bloodletting with leaches and knives), and several other treatments that horrify our modern minds were all used at St. Joseph’s State Hospital.

The horrifying cures obviously left a terrified mark on the building, but other contributing factors may have led to the hauntings of the corridors. Many of the patients that were housed at the asylum never had visitors because their families simply abandoned them after they were committed. In the early years the graves of the patients were unmarked before they were simply engraved with an identifying number. Does the lack of acknowledgement in their final resting place leave the spirits feeling as unwanted in death as they felt in life?

Around the time George Glore started the display of historical artifacts in the evolution of mental illness treatments in 1967, St. Joseph’s State Hospital began to earn its reputation for being haunted. The staff would see shadow figures and apparitions roaming the hallways and always felt as if they were being watched. There was one patient who was known for her interaction with the “spirits” of the institution—she created art, wrote poems and songs detailing her experience with the paranormal activity.

If you’re investigating the morgue, watch for the full-bodied apparition of a man. He’s often been seen around the elevators and several investigators have caught an EVP (electronic voice phenomena) of a male voice screaming “GET OUT!” Disembodied whispering is often reported as well as a female voice calling out your name when no one else is around! Moaning, whimpering, crying—it’s easy to imagine that the sounds are patients still looking for someone who wants to be their friend.

The only question that remains—are you brave enough to undergo a lone vigil in the underground tunnels?
... See MoreSee Less

5 People Interested
Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Mid Orange Correctional Facility Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 28th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday August 29th, 2021, 4:00AM

Mid Orange Correctional FacilityState school roadWarwick, NY10990 Location Map

The #haunted Mid Orange Correctional and Former Reformatory is an absolute must for every ghost hunter.

Our overnight Ghost Hunts at this location have yielded some of the most amazing paranormal activity we have ever witnessed.

It’s daunting dark energy is foreboding in the dead of night and has left many of our guests speechless.

The mysterious secrets of Mid Orange will leave a lasting impression on anyone that dares to investigate it long enough.

Are you going to be brave enough to follow the ghostly shadows that enter the tunnel system, or will take consort in one of the dark and ominous housing units?

Spend the night in one of the most haunted places in New York with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

In the 1930s, this 740-acre campus was turned into the New York State Training School for Boys, a facility which housed “troubled” young men, where they were trained or “reformed” so that they may one day go back into the community with productive work skills. Eventually, as many as 14 “shops” were built for training, and many of these at-risk youth also worked the farmland. However, there are many stories of horrifying abuse and neglect surrounding the school, which held between 400 and 500 boys at one time.

Some reports suggest that the boys’ school became a violent place, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including forms of corporeal punishment as well as stabbings and numerous attempted suicides. There are reports of a young man named Charles McBride who succeeded by hanging himself with his bedsheet in Cottage B1 on October 23, 1962. Medical records from that time also show that several residents required surgery for appendicitis – suspected to be due to the physical abuse they endured while living at the school.

Your ghost hunt at the Mid-Orange Correctional Facility and Former Reformatory includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas of this location.

Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present).

Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators.

Lone Vigils.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers.

Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water and Soda.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

1 People Interested
Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Nazareth Sanatorium Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 28th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday August 29th, 2021, 4:00AM

314 NW 4th St, Mineral Wells, TX 76067-4939, United States Location Map

The #haunted Nazareth Sanatorium, in #MineralWells #Texas, is a haven for the paranormal!

Our #Ghost Hunting events at The Nazareth Hospital and former Sanatorium will push your ghost hunting nerves to new limits.

We have exclusive access to this haunted location, including access to the 5th floor.

Just make sure you don’t leave before 2am, as the witching hour is waiting for you!

-

Event Start Time: 8:30pm

Event Finish Time: 4:00am

-

Your ghost hunt at Nazareth Sanatorium includes the following:

Exclusive Access to the most haunted areas.

Ghost Hunt until 4am.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

-

The sun is shining, and the year is 1931.

The residents of Mineral Wells had no idea the Holy Sisters of Nazareth were making their way to this “Crazy” Haunted town to take up a life that would make a name for this small town in Texas.

With Minerals Wells already known for their “Crazy Water”, yes you read that right, this historic town has something so special in the water that hundreds of thousands of visitor’s flock here yearly.

And before you think that the “crazy water” is a myth, you simply have no idea…when you visit, and you will, make sure you take some home with you and find out why it is so special.

Let’s go back to 1931.

With the sisters climbing 7 floors, 14 flights and 126 steps, they settled into the top of this 46-room hospital, with an entourage of doctors and janitor.

Who knew that many of them would spend their final days in the Nazareth Hospital caring for the sick and those in need.

Many of them were unaware of what was about to unfold over the forthcoming years, and how much they would be needed.

The Nazareth Hospital would become a beacon of hope in Mineral Wells and no one could have predicted the events that would embed into these walls and remain unexplained.

Welcome to the Nazareth Hospital, sorry we meant, the Haunted Nazareth, and former Sanatorium Hospital.

The Holy Sisters bought the building for about $135,000 which would equate to more than $2 million today. The sisters were unaware that the land was used as a Bordello, and on that subject we will leave that part right here….

It housed its own crematorium which still sits on the site today, which was last used around the 1940’s – 1950’s.

You will soon understand that love and care was a fundamental part of the hospital.

In the 1960’s the hospital added on the name “sanatorium”.

This mighty building was a beacon of hope, protection and love, and it even survived two major fires!

Every inch of this hospital had a purpose, and every floor was used to its full potential.

The 1st floor housed Tuberculosis, Polio and Psychiatric Patients.

The 2nd floor was originally designated for administrative purposes.

The 3rd floor was used as the Chapel and patient rooms.

The 4th floor was the labor and delivery room.

The 5th floor was the surgical units.

The 6th floor Nun’s quarters

The 7th floor was occupied by the Priest, until he was relocated to the property behind the crematorium.

It is no wonder why the Nazareth Hospital has a haunted reputation, those very unique people who worked here still haunt this building, and those unfortunate souls who lost their lives still wander the very empty corridors.

Do you have what it takes to walk in the shadows of those departed?
... See MoreSee Less

4 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Saturday August 28th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday August 29th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

59 People Interested
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Friday September 3rd, 2021, 8:30PM - Saturday September 4th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

29 People Interested  ·  2 People Going
The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

The Conjuring House Ghost Hunt

Saturday September 4th, 2021, 8:30PM - Sunday September 5th, 2021, 7:30AM

The Farm on Round Top Road1677 Round Top RoadHarrisville, RI02830 Location Map

Our Ghost Hunts at The Conjuring House are not for the faint of heart.

This haunted house inspired the Conjuring Movie.

The paranormal that has been captured here will even test the most avid investigator.

This overnight investigation is a “Thirteen” event.

Your time will be spent in the most haunted areas with limited guests

This is a structured SMALL guest event with the Ghost Hunts USA Team

**AGE REQUIREMENT- 18 AND OVER**

Location History:

Pull up a chair, turn the TV off and get comfortable as the history that is embedded within this land will make you truly feel that you are in a Stephen King novel.

And if you haven’t realized yet, we are talking about “The Conjuring House” which inspired the movie!

To understand the real history, we have to go back in time… a lot….1680 in fact.

The land was deeded in 1680 and was actually surveyed by John Smith, one of the original Virginia colonists.

It was a part of property dispersed among followers of Roger Williams, who founded the colony of Rhode Island.

It was not the Arnold Estate, but was instead deeded to the Richardson family who followed Roger Williams after he was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony as a dissident because he dared to suggest that there should be both freedom of religious worship and a separation between church and state, the two primary principles he espoused in the founding of this new colony to the south, located on the Narragansett Bay.

The best way to preserve the land he claimed was to deed large parcels to those who chose to follow him and his teachings.

He did so to protect it from a rather overt encroachment from Connecticut and Massachusetts, as there were relatively numerous border skirmishes ongoing at that time.

The original estate was quite extensive, encompassing more than a thousand acres, subsequently sold off in parcels to families in the area, some who are still there hundreds of years later.

Because women had no rights to property at this time in history, their estate transferred through marriage from the first colonists, the Richardson family, to the Arnold family.

As Quakers, they were likewise the abolitionists who used the property as a gateway to freedom for slaves along their path to Canada.

The house as it now stands was completed in 1736, forty years before the signing of The Declaration of Independence, and endured the ravages of relentless storms which included the Hurricane of 1938 which destroyed so many homes (and barns) in southern New England.

The barn on the property survived because it was built by a shipwright and was constructed with bowed beams that literally sway with the wind.

This magnificent homestead has survived The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, and the unbridled growth of the Industrial Age in America.

It is a national treasure. The house is a testament to the need to preserve history.

Eight generations of one extended family had lived and died in it and apparently some of them never left, or visit it with some frequency.

Because the historical chronicles of the time were dispersed or what was recorded was not salvaged, it is impossible to know the fullest extent of its past, but one thing is known.

The house speaks to those who know how to listen. History has a story to tell. We will never know all of it, some of which has been lost to the annuls of time, but one thing is certain.

There are few places like it which remain intact on the planet, and it should be protected and defended at all cost. Thankfully, the farm is in good hands, owned by responsible and individuals who understand its intrinsic value, people willing to share it with the world.

The Perron Family and Paranormal:

Purchase the Book: House of Darkness: House of Light- The True Story, Vol. 1

Perron Family Interview By: Kristen Tomaiolo – The Independent Newspaper

In 1971, the Perron family moved into a charming, old house in Harrisville. Little did they know, they were not alone.

The happenings in this seemingly unextraordinary home would forever change the Perrons’ lives.

Over the next nine years, the family learned there is no veil between the physical and supernatural world as doors slammed, beds shook and apparitions wandered by. From time to time, they were even physically harmed by spirits who wanted to make themselves known.

The Perrons’ story, along with the findings of well-known paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren who investigated the home in the 1970s, got the attention of Hollywood. Forty-two years after the Perrons stepped into the Harrisville home, “The Conjuring” hit theaters and was credited by many critics as one of the scariest movies of 2013. The film, directed by James Wan, follows the Warrens, who assist the Perrons as they experience disturbing events in their home.

“The Conjuring” is not based on Perron’s two books, but rather from the stories both Perron and Lorraine Warren shared with New Line Cinema. Her books, however, are full chronicles of the events that occurred. Perron said the film doesn’t use any singular scene that she revealed, but rather combines bits and pieces of information.

Some aspects of the film, she said, were “patently untrue.”

“There was no exorcism [like in the film]. It was a séance that went very wrong. What they portrayed in the film was not what happened,” Perron said. “It [the séance] was scarier. It was the most terrifying night of my life.”

On that night, the Warrens arrived at the house with a medium. Perron and her younger sister, Cindy, hid nearby and watched as the medium “conjured” up a spirit, who attacked their mother, Carolyn. Carolyn was picked up and thrown into another room – her body slammed to the ground. The Warrens believe Carolyn was possessed.

Perron suspects the medium opened a door she couldn’t close. Her mother, she said, most likely had a concussion from the incident, and took a long time to “come out of the condition she was in. She was utterly drained and in pain.”

The dark presence, who attacked and haunted Carolyn often, was thought to be Bathsheba Sherman, according to the Warrens. Bathsheba lived in the home in the early 1800s and was charged with manslaughter of a baby. The charges were dropped, but rumors spread that she killed the child for a satanic sacrifice. The Warrens were convinced she haunted and cursed anyone who lived in the house for control of the household.

According to Perron, the family researched the history of the home and found at least a dozen people who killed themselves or had a tragic death in the house or on the property.

After the séance, there were no more major supernatural experiences in the home, and the Perrons “lived pretty happily most of the time” in the house until they moved out in 1980, Perron said.

But Bathsheba wasn’t the only spirit to reside in the house – several benevolent spirits materialized as well. Some spirits would “act up” and make loud noises for attention when guests were around. A father, son and dog would appear at the top of the staircase and stare at a wall (like it was a window), never making eye contact with the Perrons. April Perron, the youngest daughter, made a friend with the spirit in her closet named Oliver Richardson. He was her secret friend, and she did not tell the Warrens about him in fear that he may disappear.

“For the most part, we did get used to it,” Perron said of the spirit presence.

Perron said she even caught sight of a spirit who was a spitting image of herself as an old woman dressed in 17th-century attire.

“It means we can seriously consider reincarnation or living in multiple dimensions,” she said.

Another time, Carolyn spotted two men seated in the dining room. One man recognized her presence, got the other man’s attention and pointed toward Carolyn.

“To them, she was the ghost,” Perron said. “I always considered the house a portal, but not only a portal to the past but to the future.”

It took 30 years for Perron to sit down and share her family’s story. The book-writing process and movie release have been an “emotional upheaval” for her family, as they found it hard to relive each moment.

The family was concerned skeptics would “eat up” their story, but Perron has learned to tune out those who call the family liars. On the other hand, she has positively connected with many of her readers, who write letters revealing their personal experiences with the supernatural.

“The most important reason for me to tell this story is that it exposes other dimensions of our relativity,” Perron said. “The more I talk about it, the more clarity it brings.”

The one thing that shocks most people, Perron said, is the fact that most of the family would willingly move back into the home. The five daughters lived in the home during the formative years of their lives, she said. Perron left the home at age 21. Since 1980, Perron has visited the property on several occasions and “always feels like I’m home when I’m there.”

“It’s just such a huge part of our lives and memories,” Perron said. “My mother once said, ‘We left the farm, but it will never leave us.’”

Since she was a young girl, Perron believed her family was meant to move into that house and that one day she would share their story and ordeal with the world.

“It’s not really about whether or not they exist. It’s how we perceive them,” Perron said of the spirits. “It [the experience] taught me about life, death and the afterlife.”

What's Included:

Your ghost hunt at The Conjuring House includes the following:

The Basement.

The Dining Room.

The House.

Thirteen Special Event.

Ghost Hunting Vigils.

Structured Vigils.

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

Selection of snacks.
... See MoreSee Less

86 People Interested
The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

The Squirrel Cage Jail Ghost Hunt

Friday September 10th, 2021, 8:00PM - Saturday September 11th, 2021, 3:00AM

Squirrel Cage Jail of Pottawattamie County, Iowa226 Pearl StCouncil Bluffs, IA51503 Location Map

The #haunted Squirrel Cage Jail has been featured on Travel Channel Ghost Adventures. The Squirrel Jail in Iowa is one of the most haunted jails. It was also home to the "Jake Bird" the evil serial killer who took the lives of 44 victims!

Are you ready to explore a unique piece of history and find out who may still dwell within the confines of this unusual lockup?

Constructed in 1885 and in operation as a jail until 1969, the Squirrel Cage Jail offers guests a chance to experience what life may have been like doing time (or working in) a “human-rotary” style jail. One of only three such jails of still in existence, this strange building design surely holds secrets from the past.

Your ghost hunt at Squirrel Cage Jail includes the following:

Access to the most haunted areas of this prison,
Smaller Group Sizes,
45 Minute History tour,
Psychic Medium Vigil* (if psychic present),
Group Vigils With Experienced Investigators,
Lone Vigils,
Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Readers,
Free time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils,
Unlimited Refreshments, Including Coffee, Bottled Water

Paranormal:

Not surprisingly, there are a number of reports of paranormal activity within the structure, some dating back to when the jail was still in operation. It is said a jailer from the 1950s named Bill Foster refused to use the fourth floor as his living quarters because of “strange goings-on up there,” which including footsteps when no one was up there and odd sensations when he went upstairs to investigate.

One former tour guide has claimed to have seen the spirit of J.M. Carter, the gentleman who supervised the building’s construction in 1885. He was reportedly the first resident of the fourth floor living quarters. Perhaps he has stuck around to keep an eye on things to this day.

Others have recounted seeing a full-bodied apparition, also on the top floor, who they believe may be another former jailer named Otto Gufath. Still another person stated she saw the ghost of what appeared to be a sad little girl dressed in gray, sitting inside a cell which was completely inaccessible at the time.

Over the years, visitors and employees alike have described a number of possible paranormal happenings, including feeling like they are being watched, having their clothes tugged on, hearing disembodied voices, doors opening and closing by themselves, seeing strange lights and hearing odd, unexplainable noises.

Spend some time with us and see if you can discover which spirits may still be lingering here, trying to communicate with the living – and what they might have to say about the conditions they endured at the Squirrel Cage Jail.

Location History:

In Council Bluffs, Iowa there stands a stately brick building erected in the late 1800s which houses a most remarkable lockup known as the Squirrel Cage Jail. One of only 18 of its kind built, this “human rotary’ jail is now only one of three still in existence, and the only one that stands three stories tall.

Constructed in 1885 under the supervision of J. M. Carter, the jail features 10 pie-shaped cells on each level, and each cell was meant to house between two – and some say up to six – prisoners at a time. This bizarre design was the brainchild of Indianapolis natives William H. Brown and Benjamin F. Haugh, and the intention was to “provide maximum security with minimum jailer attention,” – thus cutting down on the number of personnel needed to run the prison.

The jailer’s office, kitchen, trustee cells and women’s quarters were located in the front of the building on the first floor and living quarters for the jailer were on the fourth floor. The three levles of cells are placed on a central carousel or drum which was turned using a hand crank. The bars (or cage) are stationary and have only one opening on each floor. The cells were rotated using the hand crank until each one would line up with the cage opening so that prisoners could be accessed, but only one cell at a time.

Over time, the rotating carousel housing the cells became more difficult to turn and often became stuck, making it nearly impossible to get food or medical assistance to prisoners if needed. Inmates often suffered broken arms and legs when they would mistakenly (or deliberately) stick their limbs through the individual cell bars while the drum was being spun.

However, there are only four recorded deaths on the property during its more than 80-year run as a prison. One inmate died from and apparent heart attack. Another was found hanged in his cell. A third prisoner reportedly died when he fell three stories after trying to climb up the cage to carve his name in the ceiling. The fourth death was rumored to be that of an officer of the local police department who accidently shot himself during the confusion of the Farmer’s Holiday Association Strike in 1932 when 84 protesters were arrested and jailed.

The Squirrel Cage Jail was in operation until 1969, when it was deemed “unfit for human habitation.” In 1971, after the prison was shut down and its remaining prisoners moved to other facilities, it was obtained by the Council Bluffs Park Board. They were successful in getting the structure listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.The Historical Society of Pottawattamie County – who owns and operates the building today – headed the endeavor to protect the jail in 1977, and it is now a museum which offers a glimpse into the unique cultural and architectural history of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
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